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  • Last Post 09 February 2018
ethmoid1999 posted this 06 February 2018

Just joined. I don't cast much but shoot a lot of cast in handguns. I have molds and equipment but haven't had the time. This is my last year in the oil field and I hope to start casting then.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 06 February 2018

welcome to the group ... feel free to ask questions and comments are welcome .... we all are about having fun while improving results .  usually we have more fun than actual improvements, but we keep trying .

if you have to buy new lead from the smelters .... it makes some of the commercial casters look pretty reasonable ...  i like to keep a few bulk boxes of commercial cast around just in case i feel a need to shoot but not a need to cast ...

ken

 

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ethmoid1999 posted this 06 February 2018

Thanks Ken. I have a friend who was a nuclear pharmacist for a few years. They gave me a couple of tons of medical lead. Some of the canisters almost as large as a football and maybe twenty five pounds. Anyway, I traded it to a bullet maker and he paid me in cast bullets. I have shot a bunch but still have maybe 10, 000. I got 3000 45-70 and still need to get a 45-70 rifle!

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onondaga posted this 06 February 2018

ethmoid1999,

Glad you found us and welcome.

Friend Gary

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BigMan54 posted this 06 February 2018

Welcome, 

You have found a great bunch of guys. Ask any and all questions. Someone will know the answer. Have a problem ?

More than one person here has probably experienced it. Just check my posts & threads. If in can be screwed up or broken, then I am sure to do it. 

Good Luck. And maybe start with some good foundry lead from a place like ROTOMETALS. Much easier to learn how to cast if you have good alloy to start. Leave blending  scrap and other stuff until you learn how to make good bullets.

Long time Caster/Reloader, Getting back into it after almost 10yrs. Life Member NRA 40+yrs, Life S.A.S.S. #375. Does this mean a description of me as a fumble-fingered knuckle-draggin' baboon. I also drool in my sleep. I firmly believe that true happiness is a warm gun.

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onondaga posted this 06 February 2018

Ethmoid1999,

I offered my grandson $200 when he orders a Henry 45-70, I think they are the best in current production, either their lever or single shots are excellent. My order of preference after Henry is in order: Browning, Marlin, Winchester. I won't even discount the short barrel on a 45-70 because of what it is used for and how hard it hits out to 150 Yards. They easily dump big game with book loads, a 405 gr cast and H4198. My well proven Bear load in .458 WM is easily matched with a 45-70. I shoot an RD 350 gr FNGC at 1700 fps.

Gary

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GP Idaho posted this 06 February 2018

 Ethmold 1999: Welcome! The kids got me a Henry 45-70 last fathers day.  I agree with Gary as to their quality.  Mine has the case hardened frame and octagon barrel. It's a very fun round to load and shoot.  Lite to heavy, smokeless or black powder the 45-70 is hard to beat for a cast bullet rifle. Gp

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ethmoid1999 posted this 07 February 2018

I want a 45-70 but I just spent $1700.00 on a gun safe. It was my rathole money, a lot for me.  I've a few old, good guns getting rash in two overcrowded safes and I ordered the safe and having it put into my shop when my wife, hopefully, will be quilting or something. I don't like the way the Marlin looks but can afford it, but I hate that safety. Like a frog tattoo on a woman's face. I liked the octagon one but the short carbine, Guide Gun, is likely most useful for me. I have very brushy land and my hog shots are fast and pretty close. The Henry looks like a good one.

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BudHyett posted this 08 February 2018

.45-70 in my experience:

  • Practice, be sure to fully work the lever so that you do not short-stroke or close the lever on your trigger finger. 
  • Hunting; the barrel should not be more than 22 inches for ease of handling and walking through the brush.
  • .Hunting; shoot lots of practice loads to smooth the action
  • Target (black powder); barrel should be a minimum of 26 inches for consistency of fignition and better sight radius.
  • 45-70's are like chocolate chip cookies, you cannot stop at just one.

I like the Marlin 1895 rifle, but mine are legacy Marlin and well used.  

Country boy from Illinois, living in the Magical Pacific Northwest

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ethmoid1999 posted this 08 February 2018

Thanks, B!

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Brodie posted this 09 February 2018

Welcome aboard Ethmoid.  I too would like a 45-70 and like you I will have to content myself with shooting 45/70 type loads in my 458 Win.  Its all fun and when my shoulder heals (from replacement surgery) I will get back to casting and loading some more.

 

s

B.E.Brickey

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BigMan54 posted this 09 February 2018

Unless "henry firearms" has improved their guns magically I wouldn't touch one with a ten foot pole. I bought one of their 1st .22 rifles when they came out. COMPLETE TRASH. I know lots of guys buy them but mine was a piece of junk. I paid to send it back TWICE, (not reimbursed)  still wouldn't feed a full magazine without jamming, their customer service BLAMED ME for; 1)  Using bad/wrong/cheap ammo. 2) Not knowing enough to operate the gun properly. 3) Not cleaning the gun properly. 

I grew up on WINCHESTER & MARLIN Lever Guns, I shot COWBOY ACTION FOR 20YRS. I sure as hell know how to operate a lever gun.

I gave the to a friend, telling him it was NOT MUCH OF A GIFT.  After we transfered ownership he sold it to a gunshop in San Diego and sent me half the money.

Back in the mid-1980's I had my 22" MARLIN 1895 cut down to 18 1/2", for pig hunting. It really kicked like a MULE, so I sent it in to MAG-N-PORT.  It came back, kicked less but ROARED more.  I replaced it with a MARLIN COWBOY with a 26" octagon barrel. Easier on the shoulder. Put a Tang sight on it. Also a Scope. I could switch the scope on and off with very little readjustment. I have a Sharps too. Gave up on different loads for each. I can't hunt anymore. I don't shoot any kind of organized sport anymore, just lite loads from the bench.

I hope you have a good time shooting up those 3000 45.70 bullets. I think that would be a lifetime supply for me. 

Long time Caster/Reloader, Getting back into it after almost 10yrs. Life Member NRA 40+yrs, Life S.A.S.S. #375. Does this mean a description of me as a fumble-fingered knuckle-draggin' baboon. I also drool in my sleep. I firmly believe that true happiness is a warm gun.

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onondaga posted this 09 February 2018

Unless "henry firearms" has improved their guns magically I wouldn't touch one with a ten foot pole.  

I suggest you find a shop with a new Henry 45-70 and take a good look. Henry has drastically succeeded in renewing their commitment to America with aggressive improvement in craftsmanship. Expect Henry prices to skyrocket within 2 years due to their superior manufacturing quality.  I'd recommend you get one quickly while they are in marketing transition before they cost too much to afford. They are better than Browning.

Gary

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RicinYakima posted this 09 February 2018

"They are better than Browning." That I will have to see. The only place that sells them here is Walmart, I will have to go look.

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onondaga posted this 09 February 2018

"They are better than Browning." That I will have to see. The only place that sells them here is Walmart, I will have to go look.

 

Rick, be fair to me and yourself, Walmart won't likely have a 2017 Henry in 45-70. Look at a 2017 or 2018 Henry and you will see what I am excited about. Henry metal fit and finish upgraded for 2017.

Gary

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RicinYakima posted this 09 February 2018

I will start looking, but the two local shops don't sell Henry's. Since I live in the middle of a desert, there are not many options to look at anything in the flesh.

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