Saving lead

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  • Last Post 14 March 2018
nosee posted this 11 March 2018

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nosee posted this 11 March 2018

Filled the 100 yd.backstop full of new wood today, 2yr.old wood falling apart,splitup to get lead. Can,t have to much lead!---Nosee.

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Scearcy posted this 11 March 2018

nosee

I have a shack up north where I "need" a range built. I don't have piles of sand or dirt sitting around but I do have several large trees which blew down in a storm  3 years ago. I like your back stop plan. One old man, a small tractor with a loader and a chain saw - should be a one day project.  Jim

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nosee posted this 11 March 2018

Jim: I have 2 Grandsons, 1 is 7 other 12, they live 1/8 mi. east of me, if I let them shoot the 22 auto. they work real good. I bought them savage ss-22,s, off bench,5 in bull, 25 yds,peep sights.You should see the cant the young one shoots at 45% or more. Thank You ----Nosee

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John Alexander posted this 11 March 2018

I once shot a couple of thousand lead bullets into a 200 pound gnarly chunk of hard maple that the wood vendor said he couldn't split. To recover the lead I built a wood fire around it and tended it off and on until l had wood ashes and globs of lead.  

I remelted the lead in my casting pot and created a huge mess.  The lead wouldn't drain out the bottom pour, you couldn't dip or pour it and considered myself lucky to get it out of the pot.

I had done similar trick before but picked the lead out ot the shot up and rotted firewood years later. That worked fine.

I think it must have been the fire and whatever chemicals are in or produced by burning maple but don't know.

John

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nosee posted this 11 March 2018

John; We did about the same with our first backstop, a big round bale of hay. When it started to fall apart,I put it in a safe place and burned it. From gleaning scrap lead I knew it looked gray, in the weather after a time. So after a few days, and a rain or two I go to get may lead. Lots and lots of gray showing,I mean all over,I was so happy, picked one up, it turned to dust, wow! Lots of puffballs no lead, to much heat. The next bale, we took apart by hand,26 lbs. of lead. I don,t shoot that much, to get that much lead but I have several shooters that come to my range to sight in and shoot, mostly jacketed stuff. They go shoot prarie dog,mostly 22-250.---Thank You---Nosee

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admiral posted this 12 March 2018

I use gnarled up stumps for a back stop too. I set then up in front of my dirt berm staggered like giant bowling pins. Every couple of years when I shoot them apart I harvest the lead.

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nosee posted this 12 March 2018

Ours are in firewood lenght, when they start to hollow out in back of target we bring those out, restack and split shoot up ones apart with splitter. Some logs may have a 100 bullets in it. I sort them or thy to, keep me all lead seperated from the jacketed ones, works ok, takes some time, but I usual have some help. Thank You----Nosee

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longhunter posted this 13 March 2018

I shot in a 22 winter league years ago out in NW Iowa.  We shot in the basement of the Bank and used Cottonwood logs to shot into.  Two feet thick or so.

When the logs got full of lead and started throwing bullets back at you we would turn the logs around and shoot the other end. when the log was full we would put in new logs and split the cottonwood log to get the lead out. Usually in one big chunk.

Jon

Jon Welda CW5 USA Ret. 608 797 0056

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delmarskid posted this 14 March 2018

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I made this out of scrap, an old compressor tank, and a box of plow cutters that I found in our machine shed. The holes are from .43 Spanish and .58 Enfields at 200 yds. More drop than I expected. I had to put a plate over the top as the shredded bullets swirled up and out of the opening. The plate has two uprights that hold a piece of styrofoam insulation that makes the target backer.

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