aa2200

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  • Last Post 27 July 2013
mike morrison posted this 12 April 2009

some years ago i read in the fowling shot about aa2200. i believe that the article was about using this powder in a 45-70. shortly after this i encountered some of this powder at a gun show. i purchased a jug. tried it in the 45-70 and found that it was position sensetive. ie. if i held the rifle pointed down and then fired the rifle level versus holding the rifle up and leveling it to shoot there was a lot of difference and a lot of unburnt powder. so i abandoned this but later questioned using it in a 38-55. i called accurate using the 800 number on the jug and ask. the person i talked to said they had not worked up info on the 38-55. he ask what bullet and weight and in a short time told me where to start. i uses this data with acceptable results in a lever gun. m-94 win. cch. i have said all this to ask this question. IS THIS POWDER CORROSIVE? last week i decided to load ;and shoot this gun some and after i cleande the gun. while looking down the bore i seem to see something i could not clean out. i have one of those $40. bore scopes that lets you see a short way down the bore and it looked like there had been a termite in there and etched some of the metal away. no rust just a etched out spot. i am sure there was a time when this rifle was shot and not cleaned for a few weeks.

a fellow shooter told me that his son was in the military and they shot 30cal and 50 cal machineguns. they were instructed to clean the weapons imediately after a range session as the powder was corrosive.

any thoughts on this.

mike.

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RicinYakima posted this 12 April 2009

Mike,

I, too, bought a four pound jug of this powder when it was first released. It is not corrosive, however, there are some issues with it. It is a double based, nitroglycerin and nitrocellulose, powder that is heavily deterrent coated. It was made, I have read, for the 7.62 X 39 cartridge. It doesn't begin to burn cleanly until about 32,000 psi and was VERY hard to ignite.

It was a great powder for hot 218 Bee and 25/20 loads and OK for 357 Magnum rifle loads using small rifle magnum primers.

Like most Eastern European powders, if used at low pressures, it left the worse gummy, sticky and hard to clean powder fouling I have ever seen. So with that said, I wonder if moisture wasn't trapped under the fouling that caused your barrel problems?

Ric

 

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mike morrison posted this 12 April 2009

possible, although the gun is kept in a gun safe with a dehumidifier. mike

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CB posted this 12 April 2009

I have some of what I think you are talking about.. Datapowder 2200.. Got a bunch of it left to me by a fellow cb shooter that passed away. I agree it is dirty as the dickens when used at lower pressures, but it shot fairly well in my 308. I use it in my nef 357 mag rifle and I dont have any issues. Mike a question, did you clean the gun after shooting it and before putting it away? Or was it left dirty?

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mike morrison posted this 12 April 2009

hi jeff, it was not always cleaned right away. there were times that it may have been left for a couple weeks or so without cleaning. would you share your 357 load data with the 2200? i have been working on a load for my .357. marlin 94. i have not thought of using the 2200 powder. thanks mike

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runfiverun posted this 13 April 2009

if you know any bench rest shooters thet covet the old data 2200 powder. you might get a firstborn or a truck from them if they know what it is.

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454PB posted this 14 April 2009

I have a bunch of it, and have used it in everything from .222 Remington to 45/70. I've seen no evidence of a corrosive nature. I use magnum primers with this powder, and keep pressures up.

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CB posted this 20 April 2009

We used it in the schuetzen rifles back then, I found 2 jugs of it this winter, should be about like AA9 for burning rate in breechseating rifles, My try it in 30-06 and others if we get into a powder crunch like primers.

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RicinYakima posted this 20 April 2009

Smokie joe,

I think you will find this a lot slower than AA#9, and much harder to ignite.

Ric

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454PB posted this 21 April 2009

My chronograph testing indicates it is similar to H-322 in burn rate.

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madsenshooter posted this 09 August 2010

Just saw a note at Powder Valley, they have some of this powder, it's under specials.

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w.d.s posted this 09 March 2011

just talked to westarn powder and they are selling the accurate data 2200 powdwer again. it is 15% faster then accurate 2300. work real good in 223 full loads and jacketed bullets. but likes the magnum primers. wd

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mike morrison posted this 24 November 2012

Pulled the jug of data2200 out yesterday and was reading the lable and it shows load data for 223. do not remember the amount but was pushing a 55 fmj at 3200 i believe. Question-- has anyone used this powder with cast bullets?? If so would you suggest a good starting load with cast 60gr bullet. thanks m

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RicinYakima posted this 24 November 2012

M,

I bought an 8 pounder when it first came out as surplus about 15 years ago. It is a ball powder with a heavy deterrent coating. It is very hard to light, and leaves a lot of residue untill you get to about 40,000 psi.

It shot well in a 218 Bee with jacketed bullets and max loads, poor with all the cast bullets in 25 wcf, 32 wcf and 30/06.

FWIW, Ric

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linoww posted this 24 November 2012

Roy Smith mixed it 50-50 with 2230 in his 338 Manx with good results in the late 1990/s

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rmrix posted this 24 November 2012

It is my main powder for my 100m cowboy Lever Silhouette match loads in 25-20. 12.5 gr under NOE 80gr cast GC or same load under 84 gr Ranch Dog cast bullet or 13 gr under the old Lyman 257-312.

I also use it in the 200 meter lever silhouette in 38-55. with a NEI 275 gr bullet it starts grouping at 27gr.

It is a full case in both.

In 45-70 the accuracy and velocity start to come at too high a point.   No fun to shoot elephant loads.

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fryboy posted this 24 November 2012

i bought several jugs back when ... while i was pleased to note that they re-introduced it loading data for the new stuff isnt quite the same , the old stuff fared wonderfully in both my herrets , my 375 winchester as well as decent in the 375 jdj , i agree it likes the upper spectrum as many ball powders seem to do , after i used up several jugs and found that they had quit peddling it i stopped using it for blasting ammo in the 223 , IMHO it's really close to ye olde win 680 ( as is aa 1680 ) accurate still has data for the old stuff on their web page http://www.accuratepowder.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/DP2200.pdf

edit for add ... i dont need a first born but could maybe use a new truck ..wonder what kind of trade it'd take to talk me out of my stash ? :P

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mike morrison posted this 25 November 2012

fryboy still looking for cast 60gr 223 data start point at least. what was your blasting ammo load? I assume you are talking about fun plinking ammo?? guess i can reduce the listing on the jug by 40% and work up to clean burn. just thought someone had already walked this trail. thanks m

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fryboy posted this 26 November 2012

i used cheap FMJ's and 23 grains , i didnt get into casting for the lil 22's until just a couple years ago ( my fat fingers have a problem with the lil dudes and i can admit it ) because cast produces less pressure than jacketed stuff i honestly cant say how it will be at a reduced loading ( except for perhaps dirty ) because it seemed to prefer the upper spectrum best , sorry i couldnt currently be of more help except perhaps to state e-mail them as they are usually helpful

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mike morrison posted this 26 November 2012

thanks fryboy, today was a beautiful afternoon at 70 degrees and 5-8 mph wind. so i thought i would give the d2200 a try with cast 62grgc bullets. started with 16.0gr and worked up to 19. all results dismal. so wnt back to 16 and worked down to 15. at fifteen the bbl was dirty and the groups reduced to about 8inches. at this point i decided that the data2200 would not workout with cast in the 223. if i had a real heavy bullet i might try it again as in other 30cal i have found it worked best with heavier bullets. guess i will close the door on the 223 and d2200. thanks to all who shared. m

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delmarskid1 posted this 27 November 2012

I've been using a lot of this with cast loads because I have lots but it is dirty.

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rmrix posted this 27 November 2012

delmarskid1 wrote: I've been using a lot of this with cast loads because I have lots but it is dirty.Yup, I Agree.

As you know I am sure,   .....The reason it is dirty is we  (shooting cast) do not get the pressure up to were it burns clean. It will burn clean in cast loads if you put enough powder in the case. Many times that is not a good idea tho!

It is not the ideal powder for cast bullets but for the price - back in the day, $6.35 per lb to my door - IF you ordered enough to get it at that price - it became worth LOOKING for loads that work. I found a few loads and I'm happy - I have about 50 lbs of the stuff stashed at the cabin.

For what it was intended it, works great too.

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rmrix posted this 27 November 2012

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delmarskid1 posted this 27 November 2012

It is tough to beat in the ar-15 using Sierra match kings.

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John F. posted this 27 July 2013

The original AA 2200 powder was great for match loads in the .223. Using 55 gr Bergers and Winchester brass at 200 yards, I worked up a load that averaged 0.68” at 200 yds (.3 MOA) for six consecutive 5-shot groups.  It gave very little elevation dispersion, and as others have noted, accuracy got better as the loads got warmer.  By comparison, a similar load in the same rifle using AA 2520 that consistently grouped 0.3” average at 100 yds, but gave 1.6” - 1.8” groups at 200 yards in flat calm conditions, all vertical. 

The late James McKinney, NRA Highpower High Master and multi-time State Champion, was one of the earliest Highpower shooters to recognize this powder's potential for competition, and remarked that in his testing, it gave the lowest elevation in groups of any powder he'd tested in .223.

I've never found it in any way difficult to ignite, but I was using it in full-power loads.  It's excellent stuff -- Enjoy it if you have it!

John

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