A note of caution

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ALYMAN#1 posted this 1 weeks ago

Would like to share a recent set of events that concerned me and feel they would interest some of you also.  I noticed some time back that the power cords to both older Lyman pots I have were getting hot on both the pot and receptacle ends. With some effort and with the help of local hardware store I replaced both cords (one was 9/16" pin spacing and the other was 11/16" pin spacing.  I had used both from the same outlet in the garage behind the work bench.  A couple days ago I had the need to add another receptacle adjacent to the main receptacle for the pots, which is also the most used outlet at my workbench.  On removing it from the box, it came apart (outer plastic cover separated from the base).  The only fasteners were 2 approximately #4 aluminum screws into the plastic (bakelite?) outer section.  Obviously the heat was the major factor along with the age of the receptacle (over 35 years old).  The only thing holding the receptacle together was a round repair plug on power strip connection plugged into the outlet.  The internal parts of the receptacle were fine and doing their job.  Outlet has been replaced with a commercial unit and I believe I will check another outlet that sees infrequent use as the power point for the pots.

If this makes anyone inspect their electrical arrangement and prevents any unauthorized welding I will be happy!  If you are not electrically inclined, don't say I told you to do anything on your own.

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Ross Smith posted this 1 weeks ago

HMMMMMMMMM!

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RicinYakima posted this 1 weeks ago

Uncle Russ, (RIP) the inventor of the PID electric pot, had me replace my receptacle with one made for hospitals and it has a "T" shaped hot hole. Never had any problems since.

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Rich/WIS posted this 1 weeks ago

Receptacles are rated either 15 or 20 amp,  the slotted ones are usually 20 amp.  Also check your wire size, should be 12 gauge wire for 20 amp.  A lot of homes were wired with 14 gauge wire and 15 amp receptacles.  Depending on the pot draw is 10 amps or less, but add a hotplate or other stuff and amperage climbs.  If you have a lot of stuff on one circuit wouldn't hurt to check what size wire and breaker they are on,  

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ALYMAN#1 posted this 6 days ago

Breaker is 20 amp with no 12 -3 wire for all my garage receptacles.  No I didn't use a 20 amp outlet this time but will remember for future work.  May replace the secondary outlet with same.  I feel that the old pot cords with internal corrosion that resulted in the heat at both ends caused the problem.  I remade one cord with a new cable and wall plug assembly on the old pot receptacle and it works well.  The second cord pot end was not salvagable; the original wall plugs were molded and corroded internally.  Just glad I caught the situation in time.  Thanks for comments.

Al

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M3 Mitch posted this 5 days ago

There are several different grades of 15 amp receptacles out there, hospital grade is one of the better ones.   If you have 14 gauge wire to the outlet, it's against Code to put in a 20 amp receptacle, these have a "T" shaped neutral.  If you have 12 gauge wire you are OK to go with a 20 amp.  20 amp male plugs are very rare.  What you want is a higher grade receptacle that will grip the plug tight.  Cleaning up the male plug with some Scotch-Brite and spray liquid contact cleaner won't hurt anything either. 

The cheap "stab on" receptacles are loved by contractors as they are cheap and quick, easy to use.  But, they are crap. Remember: Good, Fast, Cheap - pick any 2.  If you pick fast and cheap, you can rest assured it ain't good!

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beltfed posted this 5 days ago

as said by Mitch,

Always attach wires on the side screws of receptacles,wrapping the wire end snugly in the direction of

tightening the screws and then

Crank the screws Tight with the screwdriver. Do   NOT stick the wires into into the "stab in" slots.

beltfed/arnie

 

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Eutectic posted this 5 days ago

Several years ago I noticed the plug on the pot was getting very warm during a casting session. This should not happen! It turned out the old receptacle was not making good contact. Replacing the receptacle cured the problem.

This lead to an investigation and the plug on the wife's vacuum cleaner was getting very warm when used in some receptacles. These could be identified because it was very easy to insert the plug in these receptacles.  Old house, old hardware, cranky old caster.  Replaced hardware, old caster remains cranky.

Steve 

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ALYMAN#1 posted this 5 days ago

Thanks for the comments - all of the above is the reason I posted this in the first place - hope it helps someone.

Al

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