Gummy guns

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David R. posted this 3 weeks ago

Today was a great day at the range. First, I discovered that my wife who is sixty five years old and had never even shot as much as a slingshot in her life enjoys shooting. I had given her a SP101 in .327 Federal Magnum last Christmas and she finally shot it today. 150 rounds later she is hooked.  Who knew? 

My own SP101, an older .32 Magnum version seems to like my latest load, but after about eighty rounds it gets gummed up and the cylinder doesn't want to close and the action doesn't want to operate. I quit shooting it for the day  until I could clean it. My wife's gun had been fine on the loads that she was shooting, but when she used her's up I gave her some of mine and it gummed her gun up the same way. 

These rounds are 3.3 grains of Accurate #5 behind a SWC from a Saeco #326, tumbled lubed in Lee Liquid Alox. This my first time using Accurate #5 and it does seem to have some residue. What does the brain trust have to say? I like the accuracy that I'm seeing with this load. While I haven't done any Ransom Rest testing, I'm clearly hitting better with it and would like to continue shooting it, but having my gun get stuck isn't working. 

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David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 3 weeks ago

David,

Two reason you could be having that issue. One is unburned powder flakes get under the ratchet and causes hard closing. The other is you maybe have too much lube on the gun. Most revolvers are designed to operate dry, with no lube. I learned long ago at the S&W armorer school to not use any lube at all. The lube only traps the powder fouling and creates problems. Only wipe down the exterior of blued and nickel guns to prevent rust. Most stainless guns need little other than cleaning. I strongly believe if you follow this advice you will have no further issues. 

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys & Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

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David R. posted this 3 weeks ago

I suspect that you nailed it. As a mechanic I'm big on lubrication. I do in fact put a dab of Rem Lube on my trigger group when I clean. This may be a hard habit to break, but I'll do my best and let you know. BTW,  how are you holding up out there in flood land? 

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delmarskid posted this 3 weeks ago

David, I load aa5 in the 327 and aa2 in the same case for 32 magnum equivalent loads. 6g in the former and 3 to 4 in the later. I get a lot of unburned powder with no. 5 when I load it light. It seems to like pressure to light off well.  

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Ed Harris posted this 3 weeks ago

I'm not positive whether the current generation SP101s have a gas ring on the cylinder.  

If not, lead residue gets blasted into the crane arbor and can bind the cylinder.  

Powder residue under the extractor is another cause.  Carry a toothbrush to clean under extractor.

ALWAYS elevate muzzle when ejecting empties so any unburned powder falls out with the brass.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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David R. posted this 3 weeks ago

Thanx Ed, I did in fact find crud under the extractor when I cleaned the gun later. 

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David R. posted this 3 weeks ago

As a vintage motorcycle mechanic my instincts are to make certain that everything is well lubricated. Everything should have oil, grease or some sort of fluid...and if some is good, more is usually better. I have had to learn the hard way that too much oil in an engine can effect rear wheel traction frown , but evidently revolvers aren't motorcycles. 

So...my question now is how best to clean my guns? I just went through the trigger group of my SP101 and simply dabbing with a Q-tip isn't going to get it. I'm thinking lacquer thinner and canned air, but wondered what those more knowledgeable would do. 

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JeffinNZ posted this 3 weeks ago

Sort of counter intuitive no to lubricant a piece of mechanical equipment.  I understand the reasoning for sure but, well, you know.

Cheers from New Zealand

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David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 3 weeks ago

Jeff,

True it sounds that way, and a little lube is no problem (a couple drops), but most tend to over lube and that is where it causes problems. For instance a drop on the crane or yoke tube (the portion the cylinder spins on) is good, but more causes the gummy buildup. I have used the dry method since the early 80s, only wiping down the exterior after cleaning. If you examine a new in-the-box revolver, you will find no lube inside the action. Again I am not saying never any lube, just don't over do it. If you find than the lube causes issues, then go without, it will not harm the firearm.  

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys & Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

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