JUST ACQUIRED SOME WONDERFUL READING MATERIAL

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mashburn posted this 22 December 2019

A few months ago there was several of us bad mouthing the American Rifleman magazine and all of us felt that it had gone down the tube. In my opinion it has sunk to the lowest level that exists.Guess what? A couple of weeks ago I stopped by a friends house for a little visit. We've been friends for several years but due to the fact that he worked all over the U.S. we would have little contact for long periods of time. He has retired for the second time and swears he is going to stay retired so maybe we can have our old friendship again.

One of his uncles had passed away and left him all of his belongings. He took me down in his gunroom to show the latest firearms he inherited from his uncle .He should have charged me a admission for that viewing. Of course I couldn't trade him out of any of them. He said that he had hauled back a bunch of early American Rifleman magazines and wanted to know if I would like to have them. Of course, I said sure. I couldn't believe what they were when we opened them up. They were complete sets starting with 1950 through the late 80's. There may be earlier ones because I haven't gotten through all of the boxes yet .A lot of the sets have duplicate copies. There was 9 copy  paper boxes full and I even found several old playboy magazines .Get this, he said that there were about twice that many more still at his uncles house and the next trip he made he would bring all of them to me .I think that all of the ones that he will be bringing are probably even older thatn 1950. I'm 75 years old and am in Gun lovers heaven when I'm reading all of this old info. I absolutely love it. My wife didn't like the smell due to the years of being boxed up so I have them out in the shop at the present. I've been trying to deodorize them by taking a big black garbage bag and laying a few criss-crossed magazines in them and throwing in some baking soda, putting in more mags and more soda &etc. It is working pretty good. I just brought some in the house tonight. She hasn't complained yet but she does have a very bad cold.. Does anyone have any suggestions for deodorization procedures? Back in the early 70's I used to go to gun shows and buy the old rifleman magazines for about a dime a piece. I just had to share this.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 22 December 2019

I was given a collection that was complete back into the 30's to the early 80's. So now I have a complete collection from the mid 30's to now. I can see the steady decline over the years. But it is really nice to go back and read the early issues from time to time. Most of the articles are well written and informative. It is also interesting to see predictions that came true and those that didn't. 

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys, Good Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

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Dale53 posted this 22 December 2019

To remove the smell, I suggest these:

https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Purifying-Deodorizer-Eliminator-Non-Toxic/dp/B071YLSWHW/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?keywords=Deodorant+packs+of+Bamboo+charcoal&qid=1576992416&sr=8-2-fkmr0

You recharge them by simply exposing them to sunlight outdoors for a couple of hours. Then they are good for a couple of months.

They work, too! I have larger sizes that are deoderizing my casting barn after varmints entered and left piles of "deposits" over the winter last year while I was hospitalized.

FWIW

Dale53

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Eutectic posted this 22 December 2019

Dang David, you sure know how to hurt a guy. Envy is an awful thing! That was a real lucky day, congratulations.

The latest issue of the Rifleman has an advertisement on the cover. I am sure it paid well. The article on Red Dot sights is a four page Glock add.

I have picked up a few old copies of the Rifleman at the local used book store and they are great to read. Funny I thought the old magazines smelled nice. But then I like the smell of Alox, I must be strange.

Merry Christmas

Steve

The curse of me and my nation is that we always think things can be bettered by immediate action of some sort, any sort rather than no sort.” — Plato

Things never change!

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Qc Pistolero posted this 22 December 2019

I had the same kind of luck a few months ago;one of my long time friend decided to sell his house and move to a smaller appartment.Since he couldn't bring everything along,he offered me 2 large boxes full of books.

Up here in Quebec,gun related books by such as Jack O'Connor,Warren Page and many other such are very few and far between.I had been looking around but only found a few in many years.And there they were,2 boxes full of them.I offered him to pay for them but he wouldn't hear anything about it.

These books help me spend many evenings very quiet,reading.And this guy has moved up many notches in my friendship ladder!

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mashburn posted this 23 December 2019

Hello David,

Thanks for the response to my post and bye the way; did you receive my pay pal payment for the.17 cal. mold? On my end it shows the payment complete.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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mashburn posted this 23 December 2019

Hello Dale53,

Thanks for the info on the charcoal bags. I'm going to try it.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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mashburn posted this 23 December 2019

Hello Eutetic,

Thanks for your response to my post. I think the present American Rifleman publications may be driving members away. I know I'm an old phoggie but there are a lot of old phoggies  like me still kicking. I hear these gripes from younger people also. I've always been a make it yourself person and when I had my gunshop open I made a lot of parts instead of buying them just for the fun of it, but it wasn't long before I got too busy and burned out to continue with that. The old magazines were filled with articles on how to build something related to firearms and shooting. With todays younger generation who don't know how to even tie two pieces of wire together, they might be awed to see that you can actually build things. I think that a lot of do it yourself knowledge is due to doing away with shop programs in high schools.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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mashburn posted this 23 December 2019

Hello Qc Pistolero,

Thanks for your response. I like to hear from people in distant locations and I feel for you not having easy access to the kind of books that you like. I Thank the lord every day for allowing me to live in one of the freest places in the world, here in Southeastern Oklahoma. Constitutional carry went into effect the first of November.

One very interesting thing  about all of the magazines that I received was all of the address changes during his lifetime. He had lived in several states so I guess he moved his magazines every time he moved. I guess he was very proud of them.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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RicinYakima posted this 23 December 2019

High School shop for a semester and drafting for a semester where required in Ohio in the early 1960's. It was the home of the major tool making industries and they always needed young men for the factories.

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mashburn posted this 23 December 2019

Hello RicinYakima,

I graduated for high school in 1962 and took four years of shop and drafting. I went on to college and graduated with 3 majors-Science-Industrial Technology-Physical  Education. I taught and coached for 29 years as either science or industrial technology. My students were so motivated that they would con me into opening up the shop at night so that they could work on their projects. When I was in high school my Dad was maintainance and I would get his keys and go open the shop very often. I was usually working on guns during these sessions. It hurts me now to see schools abandoning shop for the last 30 years or so.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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tony1960 posted this 23 December 2019

Now if you really want to remove the bad smell, maybe sprinkle a little Hoppes 9 around the place. Double fix, removes the smell and  gives a reason for all your mates to hang around.

 

You can't beat the old stuff, guns, people, dogs and magazines.

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mashburn posted this 23 December 2019

Tony1960

That would definitely work. Thanks for your response.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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hanover67 posted this 26 December 2019

I used to buy odd lot batches of American Rifleman magazines on Ebay. I don't have anywhere near a complete collection but I do enjoy reading through the older issues Even the ads were great!

My favorite is the April 1941 issue with a photo of an M-1 being fired in competition, its spent clip flying above it. Inside is an article titled "The Single Action Colt as a Match Gun."

Rob Fates

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max503 posted this 26 December 2019

Hello RicinYakima,

I graduated for high school in 1962 and took four years of shop and drafting. I went on to college and graduated with 3 majors-Science-Industrial Technology-Physical  Education. I taught and coached for 29 years as either science or industrial technology. My students were so motivated that they would con me into opening up the shop at night so that they could work on their projects. When I was in high school my Dad was maintainance and I would get his keys and go open the shop very often. I was usually working on guns during these sessions. It hurts me now to see schools abandoning shop for the last 30 years or so.

Mashburn

 

I taught shop for 12 years.  Sadly, it turned into a dumping ground.  I had classes that were 1/2 or more full of special ed kids.  Then they would put some past-his-prime special ed teacher in there who would come in late and sit in the corner and read.  I check the papers daily to see which of my ex-students got arrested.

 

I've got a bunch of old Popular Mechanics magazines.  It amazes me how handy people used to be.  They made all the stuff we now buy at Walmart.

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RicinYakima posted this 26 December 2019

 max503 and mashburn, The rational here has been the "dangerous" tools and the "children" might get hurt. Even the Junior College has dropped all manual arts programs. However, the private trade school in town has waiting lists for electronic techs, several types of mechanics and machine tool operators. They have expanded and added a block of apartments to allow for GI's and motivated kids to attend. They say that they have a 95% placement before the student graduates. Only problem is there are not jobs here, so they have to move to Seattle or Boise to work. And they are making a family living wage!

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Seven Pines posted this 28 December 2019

About a year ago, one of my students, who became aware of my shooting hobby, brought me a Lyman no. 38 manual, a Lyman no. 40, a Lyman no. 44, and four copies of ‘The Handloader’ and ‘Rifle’ from the late sixties. They were clearing out her granddads assisted living apartment. Apparently he enjoyed going through his old manuals and notes from his younger years. Would have loved to pick his brain...

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Seven Pines posted this 28 December 2019

On the industrial tech. Side of this post, my original intent was to be a shop teacher and history teacher. My advisor in college pulled me into the office one day and said: “they are going to stop having shop programs, pick a different minor degree.’ So the major in history and minors in military science and English became reality. Industrial Arts would save at least 25% of my students from jail.

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RicinYakima posted this 28 December 2019

How can a young man who has done nothing but play video games earn a living? Selling dope and pimping is the only thing. I saw it every day.

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mashburn posted this 31 December 2019

Hello to: hanover7-May503-RicinYakima-Seven Pines,

I'm just recovering from the flu and will respond to you guys at once. I took the flu shot as usual, but evidently I got a strain of flue that the shot didn't work on. My wife is still ill and she came down with it first.

I'm glad to hear from people who realize what is happening in our country as well as in our schools. In Oklahoma, the vo-tech stepped in and said "we will build you new buildings and purchase new tooling and we will pay the teachers salary and boy did the schools jump on that idea. The only problem was that instead of teaching productive things, they started teaching how to build little toy wood cars. I don't think there is much employment openings for that kind of training. During the last 12 or 14 years that I taught shop I have a lot of students who are rolling in the big bucks. I'm talking about 1,000.a day and up to 2,000.00 a day.This pay is 14 days on and 14 days off. These are in the gas and oil fields, They are Drillers, Company Men, Tool Pushers and Liaisons. These are guys who the other teachers in school thought would never amount to anything ..And a lot of their favorite(pet) students are walking around with no teeth (Meth addiction) and my students are on the top of the world. I live about 70 miles from Ft. Smith, Arkansas. Anyone with basic machine tool skills can go to work tomorrow if they want and tool and die makers are about to go extinct. Our education system has got to wake up

One of you guys mention having your shop classes filled with special Ed. students. I had a few but most of them turned into productive people. On the other hand after they had done away with my Industrial Arts program I was teaching a weighted honors class of zoology (college bound people- an A was worth 5 points instead of 4.) It was a wonderful thing until the next year we got a new principal and when I went to my first day of class, my honors class was about 70% special ed. students. It does me good to get on U-Tube and see that there is some people out there that know how do  something.

Here a few years ago I had a student that I haven't seen since he graduated about 25 years ago; send me a message to me wanting to make sure that I knew  that he amounted to something.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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Brodie posted this 01 January 2020

Some of those video gamers have gone on the design and develop video games.  A lot just flip burgers alongside the english and poetry majors.  Here in Flagstaff the community college is being changed from a farm school for NAU to a place that actually teaches usable skills.  We have an excellent construction program, in about a year there will be a program that teaches cyber security.  We have an arrangement with one of the high schools to use their toys  to teach machining.  A lot of this is coming about because of some practical thinking people.  Yes Virginia there really are some of those in the system, although not many.

B.E.Brickey

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