Lyman 410459

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boatswainsmate posted this 4 weeks ago

Hello All,

                 I started casting with these new to me bullet molds today and noticed a significant difference between the bullets coming out the 2 similar numbered molds. Has anyone else seen the 1st bullet in this picture before? All the photos I've been able to find look similar to to the second bullet. Thanks in advance. Boats

 

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boatswainsmate posted this 4 weeks ago

I figured out a way to post the pictures. Are they not visible? Thanks. Boats

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RicinYakima posted this 4 weeks ago

The moulds were made about 30 years apart and unknown number of cherries in between.

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boatswainsmate posted this 4 weeks ago

Thanks for the info

 

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45 2.1 posted this 3 weeks ago

I have one that looks like Keith did it except for Lyman's round lube groove. Somewhat different contours also.

You would be surprised to see the difference in cherries in series 40 years apart.

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John Alexander posted this 3 weeks ago

It isn't just wear and resharpening of the cherry.  Lyman doesn't always try to duplicate the original design when replacing one.  225415 from 1960s is substantially shorter than more recent ones of the same number-- improved??

John

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JeffinNZ posted this 3 weeks ago

Here is what John is referring to.  225415 and 225462.

Cheers from New Zealand

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RicinYakima posted this 3 weeks ago

From what I have read, many workers over the years made cherries for Lyman. They were made by hand on a small lathe by eye and a micrometer from a dimensional drawing. Then shaped for cutting edges and hardened. Then hand honed and sharpened for use. Some, like 452423 were made from reworked and reduced 454424 cherries to save time and material. FWIW

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RicinYakima posted this 3 weeks ago

Jeff, #2 and #3 are made for the old slip on gas checks, and #1 and #4 are made for modern crimp on gas checks.

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JeffinNZ posted this 3 weeks ago

Ric; number 3 LOVES the old style Lyman slip on checks.

Cheers from New Zealand

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Dale53 posted this 3 weeks ago

One of the things that I really don't like about Lyman molds is that you never know what you are going to get. When I order a mold, I want to get what I order. The bullet design is IMPORTANT! Take one example: The original H&G #68 was a 200 gr SWC that would feed in nearly every 1911 produced at the time. Yes, they would feed in most unaltered original GI 1911's. That is a terribly important detail. Arbitrarily changing design can produce something that really doesn't work. There are many "copies" of the #68 like the LEE SWC kind of looked like a #68 but didn't share the functionability (if there is such a word). My 1911's had custom chambers that WOULD function with the Lee but most early 1911's would not. Now, this is not a slam on LEE, as they did not call their mold a #68.

Elmer Keith quit working with Lyman, back in the day, because they wouldn't keep their mold designs "pure".

On the other hand, if the particular Lyman mold happens to be the right design, then they are good molds and you will find Lyman's in my mold collection.

Still, when I order a mold, I expect it to be what I ordered. That's why most of my molds in recent years are made by MP and NOE, etc. You get what you order...

Rant over!

Dale5

 

 

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