making little ones out of big ones

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max503 posted this 2 weeks ago

What would be the best way to render this slab of lead into pieces small enough to fit into my Lee lead pot?  It will be slow going if I use the hammer and chisel.  I'd rather not saw it because of the shavings but I guess I could.  

BTW it is either pure bullet core metal or 22 rf metal. Pretty sure it came from Winchester.  I'm going to harden it with some lino and make 9mm and 357's out of it.

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Ross Smith posted this 2 weeks ago

Send it to me, I'll take care of it.

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TRKakaCatWhisperer posted this 2 weeks ago

Find an old LARGE cookie sheet - steel - that can be supported at an angle.

Arrange it so that the molten alloy/metal will flow from it into your ingot molds or at least a smaller cast iron pot.

Melt the slab with a weed burner.  It goes fast.

(I have a 6" wide x 2' long piece of channel iron that has a bracket I welded on.)

 

 

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JimmyDee posted this 2 weeks ago

Curious.  Bolt holes for securing it?  Conduit holes?  Any idea what it's purpose was?  I'd guess it's some sort of shielding but it seems thicker than necessary for that.

Back to the topic: you have the stump -- use an axe.

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John Carlson posted this 2 weeks ago

Acetylene torch.

Holding public office should be viewed as an obligation to serve, not an opportunity to rule.

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Qc Pistolero posted this 2 weeks ago

I'd use a reciprocating saw with a large plastic underneath to collect the ''saw dust''.

This way nothing will get lost and less effort doing it.

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Brodie posted this 1 weeks ago

The hunk of lead plate may have been part of a counter weight system for a tractor or fork lift.

B.E.Brickey

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max503 posted this 1 weeks ago

It came from a bullet making facility. That's all I know.

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Brodie posted this 3 days ago

 Probably a counter weight on a fork lift.

B.E.Brickey

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