Monotype

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  • Last Post 30 May 2019
the_buckshot_kid posted this 30 May 2019

Hi all...I recently wound up with a little over 800lbs of mono,lino and ww for $500. Thought it was a good deal so I snatched it. Now, I’ve never casted with this stuff (my usual is Elmer’s 16:1) so I’m in a bit of a quandary. Would it be best to mix with pure to get the BHN down to a 11 and then should I be quenching or no?

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John Carlson posted this 30 May 2019

What are you going to shoot it in?

Holding public office should be viewed as an obligation to serve, not an opportunity to rule.

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the_buckshot_kid posted this 30 May 2019

My .357, .44mag and .30-30 is all I cast for.

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Bud Hyett posted this 30 May 2019

If you have the facilities, mix 66 pounds wheel-weights with 34 pounds linotype for one hundred pounds of consistent alloy. You do not state what the source is and I fear the linotype and monotype are used and have been doctored from original specification in usage. I bought a big lot of monotype one time and found the hardness varied as I added type letters. When I melted it into separate lots of 100 pounds, the hardness within each lot stabilized. 

I have a big cast iron kettle that allows making one hundred pounds of consistent alloy, you may not:

  • Flux well and stir well, to get a homogeneous mixture.
  • Separate each alloy mixture as you make it.
  • Quench only if you are shooting super high velocity.  

Farm boy from Western Illinois, living in the Magical Pacific Northwest

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JeffinNZ posted this 30 May 2019

11 BHN is fine for the vast majority of applications.  Don't water quench.  Don't fall into the 'harder is better' camp.  It's not the case.  I shoot a lot of 40-1 alloy that is 8 BHN.

Cheers from New Zealand

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Dale53 posted this 30 May 2019

If that lot of mixed metal were mine, I would do just as Bud has suggested. Then, I would take a small amount and cast a few test bullets from each batch. Let the bullets sit two weeks to let the hardness stabilze and use a hardness tester. NOW, you will know exactly what each batch gives you (mark the hardness and keep with each separate batch). That way, you'll be able to confidently continue into the future.

I favor the LBT hardness tester. You test directly with the bullets you have cast, it is quick, consistent, and correct.

FWIW

Dale53

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the_buckshot_kid posted this 30 May 2019

Thanks for the info guys. Everything has already been cast into 1-2 lb ingots and marked as to what it is...mono, ww, lino. I do have Verals tester but haven’t used it much. There’s a guy named Marcus who does vids on YouTube. He uses what he calls a “mixing cross” to blend alloys. Haven’t tried it has anyone else?

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