Powder Paint Coated Bullets

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  • Last Post 30 July 2017
alco posted this 02 February 2017

I just made my first batch of powder coated bullets.  It was a lot less messy than regular lubed bullets.  I believe my gun will be a lot cleaner when I get through shooting than with the traditional lubes.  I'm off to the range tomorrow to see how they shoot and if they lead the barrel !!

If this works, it's going to take me awhile to get used to brightly colored bullets..............

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SierraHunter posted this 02 February 2017

I've been powder coating for awhile now. I do like it in lower velocity guns, and havnt seen much loss in accuracy. I have not tried it at higher pressure/velocity yet though.

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GP Idaho posted this 02 February 2017

alco:  I've been up on the pulpit preaching the benefits of powder coating for quite some time here at the CBA and have found it a pretty hard sale. What I believe it comes down to is just what are your goals with the ammunition you shoot and what are your personal abilities. Most of the old guard here are competitive bench rest shooters specializing in cast bullets and if you read the match results in TFS you won't find powder coat as their choice of lube. As for me and a few other members powder coating works very well in our recreational firearms. With most of the rounds I shoot 1 MOA is great and 2 will suffice. PC for me is an excellent choice especially for handguns and pistol caliber carbines where the primary goal is to manufacture your own ammunition for whacking yon bean can or far off white rock. The cleanliness of the process is a big advantage in both your firearms and loading tools.  Three patch clean up of your guns and the ability to use the Redding Comp seating dies and bullet feeders on your progressive press without gumming up the works come to mind. For me powder coating is the best option for how I load and shoot. For others here it may not fill the bill. We're just not all cast from the same mould.  Enjoy your shooting. Gp

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SierraHunter posted this 02 February 2017

Very, very soon, I plan on running some more scientific test testing accuracy of PC vs. Traditional lube in various calibers and platforms. Probably right after I am done with the 300 blackout.

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GP Idaho posted this 02 February 2017

SH:  Check out posts by Ric in Yakama and the tests he ran with a man posting as  Tech. Might help in your efforts. I'll watch for your results. Gp

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Scearcy posted this 02 February 2017

Its taken me 5 years to make the switch from a lube sizer to 45-45-10 and a push through sizing die.  One of my recreational shooting cronies is just getting started powder coating for our 9MMs. It seem to work very well for that. The first articles I saw on powder coating made it seem like brain surgery.  I know that it doesn't need to be that hard.  Perhaps you guys can provide a practical guide to powder coating for the common man. I'll look for Ric's thread.

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GP Idaho posted this 02 February 2017

Jim;  Jump over to the Cast Boolits forum and read the threads on lubes and their alternatives. A true wealth of information. Pay special attention to a man posting as Dragonheart  He's very informative as powder coating is his business.  Gp

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onondaga posted this 03 February 2017

alco

The powder-coating works for bullet lube well. However be skeptical of it's aficionados that claim it increases bullet diameter to make a bullet fit. It ain't metal and flakes off promoting gas jetting if your bullets are small no matter how thick the coating is or how strong it claims to be. It is no cleaner and no better than 45:45:10 correctly applied. It is prettier in color than clear tack free 45:45:10 applied correctly. 45:45:10 also has no velocity or pressure limit either, your bullets do.

Also, if your bullets lead the bore, they don't fit, your alloy is wrong for the load level or your rough bore is abrading them, It ain't the lube when the bullets fit correctly..

 I have tested 45:45:10 with ink verified fit bullets strong enough for the load and a polished bore  to 2600fps in .223 Rem.. Zero lube failure but accuracy began to drop a little lower than that. If you get everything right you get a slight lube star on the muzzle starting at about 5-10 rounds and your firearm shoots clean with zero leading.

Gary

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Scearcy posted this 03 February 2017

I have not experienced any leading since I switched to 45-45-10. Nor do I mind the “mess” once I started applying it to warm bullets (an over simplification I know, Gary ). I find the first cleaning patch through a dirty bore pushes harder than with conventional lube but the barrel actually cleans up with fewer patches. An extended accuracy comparison among the 3 lubing methodologies  would be interesting but a PITA to do with much rigor.

Jim

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SierraHunter posted this 03 February 2017

I'm not familiar with 45-45-10

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GP Idaho posted this 03 February 2017

alco; Most of us enjoy the tinkering involved in our cast bullet craft and each have their own means of achieving our different goals. Beware of the advice from anyone with the  if you don't do it my way, you're doing it wrong attitude. There are many products and tools available to us to aid in our quest.  I've brewed up my own batch of 45-45-10 (Now there's a mess for you, just buy the White label) 45-45-10 is by far the better choice than LLA alone. Also, no argument here as to proper bullet fit being the all important thing in our craft. PC is another tool among many to help get that fit. Be aware that you are changing the dimensions of the bullet over it's entire surface and this can be a good thing or bad especially with bore riders. As to Gary's comment that powder coating “flakes off” it simply doesn't happen with a properly cured coating. You can smash a PC'd bullet with a sledge hammer with out “flaking” when properly cured.  In conclusion, just do what works best for you in your application.  Tumble lube, pan lube, use your star or lyman lube sizer, powder coat or HyTec all work just fine when properly done. Enjoy the day. Gp

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Scearcy posted this 03 February 2017

Good advice!

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SierraHunter posted this 04 February 2017

One huge advantage I see to the powder coat, is that it won't melt in high heat like beeswax based lubes will.

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David R. posted this 27 April 2017

I'm curious to learn. I have been shooting some of the A.C.M.E. “Lipstick” bullets as they are supposed to be “range friendly” I some times shoot at an indoor range where jacketed ammo is required. I want to be able to shoot my own bullets exclusively. This process of of interest to me. 

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GP Idaho posted this 27 April 2017

David R.  It would be hard to think of a question or answer on “How to” powder coat that hasn't been asked and answered in the “Coatings and Alternatives” threads over at Boolits.  Powder coating is a simple process and in truth it's pretty hard to mess it up. Just follow a few important steps and you'll be a coating pro in no time.  Anything I can do to help you out, feel free to PM me.  Best of luck. Gp

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codarnall posted this 30 July 2017

I have been gifted many pounds of cast bullets this year.  Many were powder coated, some castings made with concoction of Kirksite (Al and Zn) and Pb.  Copper clad castings that would normally jam when feeding ended.  Pistol loads were very accurate and there was no sign of metal fouling.  My interest was primarily finding whether or not cast bullets could be relied on for very high velocity and remain accurate. I have not considered the effect of throat erosion due to sustained high long lasting temperatures from large charges.I am not concerned with chemicals that polymerize in weeks or minutes they are still polymers.  Linseed oil a prime example.  Coating myself I found that the shake and bake methods worked the best.  The Harbor Freight system comes ready for the garbage bin.

 

Plain base coated bullets were fired just to foul the rifle, speeds of about 2800fps.  A shooter had also sent some bullets by BAMA, the only difference from jacketed slugs were that there were .310 at the driving bands I loaded them to 2450fps.  Perfect in every way they looked like a life time to make by my sloppy methods.  The immediate question I had was how much effort and tooling went in to the product.  My first experience with bore riding bullets were the Lyman 311290 more that 50 years ago,  they seemed to keyhole and any speed using the same M70 Win.  I have learned a lot since then.  For economy and accuracy many will want to stick with cablecar speeds which I find fine.  It’s just my nature to experiment with everything.

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