stick on wheel weights

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  • Last Post 15 April 2019
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max503 posted this 15 April 2019

Anyone familiar with these?  I work near a large warehouse complex.  There are many commercial vehicles - semi's and buses.  When I see these weights on the ground I gather them up with the help of my handy-dandy screwdriver.  They are usually stuck to the road near intersections.  I think the vehicle hubs heat up when braking, then the adhesive melts and the weights fall off.  Then I get 'em.laughing

The bigger ones are 2 ounces each, so that one string is 1/2 lb of lead!   The smaller ones are 1 ounce each and they come off bus wheels.

I've been tossing these into my pot.  They act like pure lead.  Just though I'd post this because I don't remember anyone discussing them.

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Brodie posted this 15 April 2019

They are pure lead, or at least very soft lead wheel weights.  Alloy them or use them to cast muzzleloader bullets, balls etc.  Just don't get hit while collecting them.

B.E.Brickey

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JeffinNZ posted this 15 April 2019

I add some tin based Babbitt I have to make nominal 40-1 alloy and have even heat treated this from 8 BHN to 13 BHN.

Cheers from New Zealand

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x101airborne posted this 15 April 2019

I use the 1/2 ounce ones all the time. They work great and very little dross. 

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max503 posted this 15 April 2019

I add some tin based Babbitt I have to make nominal 40-1 alloy and have even heat treated this from 8 BHN to 13 BHN.

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I thought babbit had copper and it was to be avoided.  Kind of like pewter.

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JeffinNZ posted this 15 April 2019

I add some tin based Babbitt I have to make nominal 40-1 alloy and have even heat treated this from 8 BHN to 13 BHN.

*****************************************************

I thought babbit had copper and it was to be avoided.  Kind of like pewter.

There is a myriad of different types of babbitt. As a 'sweetner' the material I have works brilliantly.

Cheers from New Zealand

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