WEAVER T36 XR SCOPE

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  • Last Post 23 December 2017
joeb33050 posted this 16 October 2017

I've been looking for another T36, have had 2 for a while with no problems. Weaver has the T36 XR NOT AO, SIDE PARALLAX ADJUSTMENT  scope on sale at $379 with a $30 rebate. Couldn't find a review, bought it anyhow, shot it today, 26 cast and 12 5 shot jacketed 100 yard groups.

Gripes:

The W and E turrets are not graduated, no marks. It reads, ex, "0", but you don't know which "0" it is. With 48 min of adjustment, the "0" crosses the fiducial line 6 times from all down to all up. This is a PITA, but easily overcome and lived with.

The parallax set for my eyes reads between 100 and 150-not a big problem, but my Lyman STS scopes read on the money, made in the 50's.

Focus. Ocular was screwed all the way in. Instructions say loosen the lock ring and turn 1/8 turn, look at the sky to focus on reticle. BS. Has been BS since Lippershey. Eliminate parallax at 100 yards, look at anything at 100 yards, Turn ocular till it's in focus, adj parallax, focus ,repeat till the item is in focus and no parallax.  

Grins:

Clear as a bell, I shoot at 1 dot on the paper, adjust the scope to make groups at various points around the dot. My others, and this scope track very nicely. Everything works great, and lifetime warranty. I could send it back, but I'll keep it. If you can handle the lack of index marks, it's just fine.

joe b.

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mrbill2 posted this 21 October 2017

Made these up on the printer. 1/8 clicks on my older weaver 36. Don't know if this would work on yours.

mrbill2

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joeb33050 posted this 22 October 2017

Made these up on the printer. 1/8 clicks on my older weaver 36. Don't know if this would work on yours.

I can read the knob graduations fine, it's the turret graduations that are missing. I can work with that, not a big problem-but it would be nice if....;

Thanks;

joe b.

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mrbill2 posted this 22 October 2017

OK Joe.  Now I understand. Sometimes it takes a little longer.

Bill

mrbill2

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John Alexander posted this 23 October 2017

Since we have no solution for Joe, I would like to shift the thread but still on Weaver adjustments.  I have a couple of Weaver T36 scopes and the numbering on the elevation knobs drive me nuts.  Instead of the numbers going from 0 to 8 minutes (one turn of the knob is 9 minutes) it goes from 0 to 4.5 minutes one way and 0 to 4.5 in the other direction.  I think most folks think of a zero elevation and then up from there -- at least I do.  At any rate when your scope is on a number it is hard to remember if that is the 3 meaning 3 minutes up from 0, or the other 3 meaning 6 minutes up from zero. 

All the other scope manufacturers seem to have figures this out.  I have no idea why Weaver is so pig headed except for the few cents they save having it the same as the windage knob.  I noticed that Joe's new Weaver has two 4s on the elevation knob -- very helpful.

Mr. Bill's paper strips changes that to from 0 to 8 minutes above zero -- much less confusing for me at least,  He gave me some which haven't been unearthed since the move from Maine to Oregon.  I have just manufactured my own but have questions for Mr. Bill.

What was the glue you found to work well.  Did you use plastic tape over them for protection or coat?

Thanks for the information.

John

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RicinYakima posted this 23 October 2017

John, I think the .22 BR-50 guys convinced Weaver to  do the scale from zero in the late 1980's. The game was really tough and the knobs were meant to set to "zero" then fooling with one click up/down or right/left or both. The intent was at the end of the day you could go back to mechanical zero for your ammo. You could be making 50 changes in 30 minutes and lose were you started from. Even then .22 target ammo was $.20 a shot for the good stuff. Ric

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John Alexander posted this 24 October 2017

Thanks for the explanation Rick.  They must buy only a small fraction of the production and any windage knob would serve them.  For the rest of us it is a PITA but a minor one that can be fixed with Mr. Bill's little piece of paper.

John

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mrbill2 posted this 24 October 2017

John

The glue I used was Staples Glue Stick.Just put it on the back of the paper and line it up, then cover with clear tape.

mrbill2

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RicinYakima posted this 24 October 2017

The squeaky wheel gets the grease! I'm surprised they are still making them that way, as BR-50 died over 15 years ago.

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OU812 posted this 24 October 2017

The windage and elevation knobs on my T36 are stiff and a little hard to turn. Is this common?

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joeb33050 posted this 25 October 2017

The windage and elevation knobs on my T36 are stiff and a little hard to turn. Is this common?

The new Weaver knobs are EASY to turn, a surprise. Little effort, but still click nicely. The 2 "old" Weaver scope knobs turn 2-4 times harder, never noticed due to my almost superhuman strength, still clicked nicely. Never a problem with either of the 3. 

I stay away from the extremes on W and E, don't want to hurt anything.

joe b..

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joeb33050 posted this 26 October 2017

 

This scope has about 48 minutes/inches of adjustments.

 

I don’t like to crank a scope knob to either end of the adjustments, for fear that I’ll damage something.

 

I turned the knobs almost all the way “IN”  = clockwise, and set the knobs to “zero”, easily done.

 

The knob zeroes 5 times per revolution, at 0, 9, 18, 27, 36 and 45.

 

The windage knob should be no problem with the scope on one gun; it isn’t going to change very much.

 

The knob reads, left to right, 0,1,2,3,4,4,3,2,1,0; 9 minutes/inches per revolution. The knob as always just above or just below a zero on the barrel zero line.  Add or subtract as needed.

 

If I get lost on elevation, I record the setting and turn the knob all the way to zero, counting the revolutions. ex: setting is the left hand “3” plus 5 clicks. Turn the knob clockwise, “0”passes the barrel zero line 3 times, the correct record is 3 X 9 + 6 + 5 clicks = 33 + 5 clicks.    

 

I record scope settings as “number and clicks”, ex: “33+5”.

 

If the scope is put on another rifle, zero with a load and record the settings, turning the knobs clockwise to zero as needed.

 

Setting and recording settings with this scope is much simpler than this explanation, there’s nothing to it.

 

It would be marginally better/easier if the new scopes had markers on the barrels, like the old scope.

 

It appears that many other scopes have knobs adjustable/settable to zero.

joe b.

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joeb33050 posted this 26 October 2017

Since we have no solution for Joe, I would like to shift the thread but still on Weaver adjustments.  I have a couple of Weaver T36 scopes and the numbering on the elevation knobs drive me nuts.  Instead of the numbers going from 0 to 8 minutes (one turn of the knob is 9 minutes) it goes from 0 to 4.5 minutes one way and 0 to 4.5 in the other direction.  I think most folks think of a zero elevation and then up from there -- at least I do.  At any rate when your scope is on a number it is hard to remember if that is the 3 meaning 3 minutes up from 0, or the other 3 meaning 6 minutes up from zero. 

All the other scope manufacturers seem to have figures this out.  I have no idea why Weaver is so pig headed except for the few cents they save having it the same as the windage knob.  I noticed that Joe's new Weaver has two 4s on the elevation knob -- very helpful.

John; my "old" T36's have two 4's.  Maybe there are several versions.

joe b.

 

 

Mr. Bill's paper strips changes that to from 0 to 8 minutes above zero -- much less confusing for me at least,  He gave me some which haven't been unearthed since the move from Maine to Oregon.  I have just manufactured my own but have questions for Mr. Bill.

What was the glue you found to work well.  Did you use plastic tape over them for protection or coat?

Thanks for the information.

John

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joeb33050 posted this 23 December 2017

Still a completely satisfying scope after 2 months and 836 shots. The easy-click adjustments are absolutely accurate and the parallax knob has broken in so that zero parallax at 100 yards now reads 0. Rifle accuracy has improved, recoil reduced, less smoke and mirage; and my knee hurts much less.

Merry & Happy;

joe b. 

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OU812 posted this 23 December 2017

Joe, 

Did you find and adjust for crosshair center before mounting? I try to find center and then mount scope. If you are lucky very little knob adjustment is needed to hit bulls eye. Sometimes I have to use adjustable rings or bases if center is way off when bore sighting.

You can use a small mirror to find crosshair center on lower powered scopes. On high powered target scopes I rotate scope in some type of V block to center reticle. You can also rotate your scope inside rings to find center. Some say counting clicks (left/right, up/down) is just plain wrong to do when finding center.

Finding scope crosshair center video. The Burris rings with plastic inserts will make it very difficult to spin scope, so a V block is needed or another rifle with steel or aluminum rings. I first find center then adjust by looking down barrel at target. Adjustable rings or bases may be needed if center is too far off.

 

 

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