Uses For WD-40

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  • Last Post 13 March 2011
CB posted this 02 May 2009

This was sent to me by the new director of membership, he isnt much of a forum kind of guy, but I felt this was good reference material worthy of posting here. Jeff

I had a neighbor who had bought a new pickup. I got up very early one Sunday morning and saw that someone had spray painted red all around the sides of this beige truck (for some unknown reason). I went over, woke him up, and told him the bad news. He was very upset and was trying to figure out what to do. Probably nothing until Monday morning, since nothing was open. Another neighbor came out and told him to get his WD-40 and clean it off. It removed the unwanted paint beautifully and did not harm his paint job that was on the truck. I'm impressed! WD-40 who knew?   Water Displacement #40. The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a water displacement compound. They were successful with the fortieth formulation, thus WD-40.. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.   Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you...' IT IS MADE FROM FISH OIL' When you read the 'shower door' part, try it. It's the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass. It is a miracle! Then try it on your stovetop... It is now shinier than it has ever been before.   1) Protects silver from tarnishing.. 2) Removes Road tar and grime from cars. 3) Cleans and lubricates guitar strings. 4) Gives floors that ..just-waxed.. sheen without making it slippery. 5) Keeps flies off cows. 6) Restores and cleans chalkboards. 7) Removes lipstick stains 8) Loosens stubborn zippers. 9) Untangles jewelry chains. 10) Removes stains from stainless steel sinks. 11) Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill. 12) Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing. 13) Removes tomato stains from clothing. 14) Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots. 15) Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors. 16) Keeps scissors working smoothly. 17) Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes 18) It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor! Open some windows if you have a lot of marks. 19) Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car. Removed quickly, with WD-40! 20) Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide. 21) Lubricates gea r shift on lawn mowers. 22) Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises. 23) Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.. 24) Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close. 25) Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers. 26) Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles. 27) Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans. 28) Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling. 29) Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly. 30) Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools. 31) Removes splattered grease on stove. 32) Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging. 33) Lubricates prosthetic limbs. 34) Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell). 35) Removes all traces of duct tape. 36) Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain. (In the movie; “My Big Fat Greek Wedding", didn't the father use Windex for that?) 37) Floridians favorite use 'Cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.' 38) Protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements. 39) WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. 40) Fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch. 41) WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe with a clean rag . 42) If you've washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and re-wash. Presto! Lipstick is gone! 43) If you spray WD-40 on the distributor cap, it will displace the moisture and allow the car to start.   I keep a can of WD-40 in my kitchen cabinet over the stove. It is good for oven burns or any other type of burn. It takes the burned feeling away and heals with NO scarring. Remember, the basic ingredient is FISH OIL And No, I don't have any stock in WD-40

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Dollar Bill posted this 02 May 2009

Jeff,

Please tell him “Thank you” from me, we appreciate the folks that work behind the scenes and that I wish him the best of luck in his position.

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KenK posted this 02 May 2009

I have an uncle that uses it as a liniment for his arthritis pain.

It's not made out of fish oil though, it's petroleum based.

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BruceV posted this 02 May 2009

How remarkable!  Who'd of thought that something invented in connection with a now defunct missile program would have so many varied uses around the home and shop.  I am about to be out and about making visits to church members.  As I have an abundance of bugs on the grill of my car, I will be stopping by ACE Hardware and buying some WD-40.  I might even use it on one of my “missile launchers...” probably a S&W M-28... maybe a older model 1903.  Yes I can see how this stuff might just have some application in my tool box and gun box!  Sincerely.  Bruce.

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Ed Harris posted this 18 May 2009

The “fish oil” statement is “snake oil."  According to the Material Data Safety Sheet for WD-40 on the company web site it is 45-50% Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, 15-25% Petroleum Base Oil, 12-18% LVP Aliphatic Hydrocarbon, 2-3% Carbon Dioxide and <10%  other non-hazardous ingredients.

See: http://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/msds-wd494716385.pdf>http://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/msds-wd494716385.pdf

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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devin1955 posted this 18 May 2009

My favorite site for debunking or substantiating claims found on the net, Snopes.com, has this to say. Included is a modified list of uses from the manufacturer. http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp -Don

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tturner53 posted this 18 May 2009

:shock:I had the belief it was banana oil. Now I know, don't eat it. In case anyone doesn't already know, you can buy it in gallon jugs at the hardware store and they also sell a handy refillable spray bottle, though it's not necessary. I'm a cement finisher, I spray it on my trowels to go faster, like a rocket.

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jimkim posted this 19 May 2009

I use it as a starting fluid. It displaces moisture pretty well. I don't use it on guns or anywhere I need a moisture barrier. It evaporates too fast and the film it leaves behind isn't substantial enough to be effective. JMO

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Brodie posted this 19 May 2009

Don't use it on your fishing reel.  i.e. Halibaut don't like wd40, but they do like hydrolic fluid.

B.E.Brickey

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CB posted this 09 June 2009

When I worked in engine test I put it on my hands to get the diesel fuel off hands and made my joints feel better.

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Slingshot_IL posted this 01 March 2011

I usually spray a little bit on my Rice Crispies in the morning:shock::cool: Helps lubricate the other end at the end of the day /forum/images/emoticons/134.gif

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Ed Harris posted this 01 March 2011

WD40 is mostly petroleum distillate and Stoddard Solvent. See

http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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Johnny Breedlove posted this 01 March 2011

Slingshot_IL wrote: I usually spray a little bit on my Rice Crispies in the morning:shock::cool: Helps lubricate the other end at the end of the day /forum/images/emoticons/134.gif

Even in jest!, and I do belive you are just kidding. I don't think it's a good idea to suggest putting it on your Rice Crispies. Some folks sometimes don't know when you are kidding even with the icons. It says on the warning lable that it can be hazardous to your health even death.

I truley like WD-40 I use it for a lot of things. I was at a gun show in Phoenix back a number of years ago and I over heard a guy say to someone that you should never use WD-40 on a gun especially on the bluing ( in his own words it will take the bluing off). That is IMHO a wives tale, as I have been using it on my guns for well over 30 years and they don't show any effect from using WD-40 on them, other than they always look really nice after using it. I have never had one rust that has been in my safe for 6 or 8 months at time with out even looking atthem.

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Slingshot_IL posted this 01 March 2011

LOL yes I am kidding.

I agree with Using WD40 on firearms. My father has used WD40 on all of his firearms for years with no ill effect to them. Are there lubricants that are better? Could be.? Depends on the application and what it is applied to.

Some guys swear by Kroil, Rem-Oil, Ballistol, 3 in 1.... etc. etc. I find WD40 to be a general purpose lubricant and use it on most things. I do have all the others also.

Some say it attracts moisture and dries out quickly. Would I use it for a long term storage of firearms? Dunno. If its all I had I would.

Jeff / Slingshot

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oldhoss posted this 03 March 2011

WD-40 is just fine for use on your guns. I have used it for at least 30 years with no problems. The fact that it does evaporate and leave a very thin film is, in my opinion, one of its good points. WD-40 and some 0000 steel wool is great for removing minor rust without damaging the blueing. I wouldn't eat it though.

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codarnall posted this 12 March 2011

Cell pone dropped in you know where. WD-40 dried it out. Speaker was a little scratchy but probably needs more. Charlie

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gussy posted this 12 March 2011

A word of caution: Quite some time back I was at a shooting range and was having a conversation with a very badly scarred woman. She told me she was an electrician and was spraying WD on live contacts when it exploded in a ball of fire and that was how she was burned.

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bsdger45 posted this 12 March 2011

I have three one quart “Sure Shot” aerosol dispensers in which I have WD-40. The slight drip from the nozzle that runs down the front of the unit evaporates, and gradually builds up a deposit of gum and varnish that can only be removed with acetone. I spray my lathes, mills, and grinder chucks with the stuff, and buy it by the gallon. Things still rust, but now I mix one pint of ATF to each gallon of WD-40. I like the smell of WD-40 and use a lot of it, but not on my guns. These are much better products.

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shjoe posted this 13 March 2011

i keep a can of wd40 on my work bench and use it often. in the past, didnt they use propane as a propellent in those cans? not shure if they still do.

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codarnall posted this 13 March 2011

It can flash in the right circumstances like spray on red hot metal with an ignition source present, but so can corn starch, sugar dust, flour mill dust etc. Antifreeze too!

Would the webmaster here please run these very sensitive issues by Al Gore.

CFC's etc.

Charlie

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Slingshot_IL posted this 13 March 2011

Don't you know that Al Gore created WD-40? He also created the internet, where have you been under a rock? B):D:coffee

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Clod Hopper posted this 13 March 2011

I use it to cut anti-seize when it gets dry. Spray WD-40 on first and the antu-seize flows into every crevice like water!

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