micrometer choice

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kbuck posted this 22 July 2009

I need to buy a good, solid 0-1” micrometer. I would like a Starrett, but they are very expensive. Do I need to “bite the bullet” and get the Starrett? (I've been looking to use that phrase since I got on here.)Any preferences for other brands? Thanks

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303PV posted this 22 July 2009

Starrett is of course very good. What about Mitutoyo? I use a metric one. I bought it about  30 years ago and it still  is OK.

http://www.mitutoyo.com/TerminalMerchandisingGroup.aspx?group=1100>http://www.mitutoyo.com/TerminalMerchandisingGroup.aspx?group=1100

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canalupo posted this 22 July 2009

kbuck

I had a craftsman (Sears) for 20 or 30 years. Recently had to replace it. Picked up an RCBS for less than $35. It does everthing I need it for. Makes a nice, fancy c-clamp too.

 

Thanks Bob D

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Dollar Bill posted this 22 July 2009

Because I use precision measuring equipment on a daily basis, Starrett and Mitutoya are top choices. But having said that, current Craftsman and other PME that may have been made in China generally work just fine. We've used them in daily service and have held their calibration just fine. For occasional use, you can not beat the price. They just don't hold up well with long term daily use, for the most part. 20 years ago, they were better made because they wanted to break into the US market. I still have a set of dial calipers I paid $15 for that work, and are just as accurate as my Starretts. The choice is yours, as any of them will work for the typical handloader.

Note: do not be fooled by digital mics and calipers that give a read-out to 5, 6 or more digits. Even top grade digital calipers are only accurate, as stated on the tool and literature, to .0005. Mics are generally only accurate to .0001. you get the same accuracy from a purely mechanical tool. They are easier to read, though, especially if you have problems with your eyes or vernier scales.

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2Tite posted this 22 July 2009

Stay with the top names..But...check out a pawn shop. I've gotten top name tools in near new condition at excellent prices. With the economy slow it seems that the shops are offering some good buys right now.........

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RicinYakima posted this 22 July 2009

I've got to agree with 2Tite on this idea. I bought a 1” Starrett with scale to read down to 0.0001” for $40. It had even been recertified three months prior and was “like new". Ric

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kbuck posted this 22 July 2009

Thanks for the guidance. No more than I will probably use it, I'll look for something that's priced for a budget. I just didn't want to throw money away on the cheaper stuff if you all had said that they could not give dependable service. I couldn't justify $175-250 for a commercial duty one. Thanks again. Now back to figuring out which sizing die I'll need so I can get to the range!

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CB posted this 22 July 2009

Mitutoyo or Fowler. MSC or Pawn Shop. I have Starrett and Craftsman. They all do what they are supposed to do.

Stephen Perry

Angeles BR:fire

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BruceV posted this 23 July 2009

Starrett is excellent. Check the pawnshops. Have two... cost was $25 each. JMHO. Sincerely. BruceV.

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jimkim posted this 23 July 2009

I like Starrett, S-T and old Brown & Sharpe mikes. I had a Craftsman I didn't care for, but that was in 1988, and I have never bought another one. I don't know anything about the new ones.

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kbuck posted this 23 July 2009

Well, I found a Mitutoyo at Sinclair's for $74. It is the very basic 1” model that is enameled. Waiting for it to arrive. Thanks for the guidance and patience with the multiple posting of this same topic.

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Dollar Bill posted this 23 July 2009

Good choice. Good price. No batteries to go dead. It'll last you the rest of your life.

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6pt-sika posted this 23 July 2009

I've got Brown and Sharpe Mics and dial calipers I've had for about 20 years and they are still first rate !

 

I am a big proponent of Starret and B&S !

But I ain't to sure either of them are made in the USA any longer . What I have was made here .

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CB posted this 23 July 2009

All the Mics

All the Mics work good. If you have a set of standards you can make any working Mic work.

Stephen Perry

Angeles BR:fire

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shadowrider posted this 26 July 2009

Brown & Sharpe are just as good as Starrett. I would go to a pawn shop and get a B&S, Starrett, or Mitutoyo. They are excellent and pretty much everywhere so finding one shouldn't be a problem.

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kbuck posted this 26 July 2009

The Mitutoyo I ordered from Sinclair's should arrive tomorrow. I know I paid retail, but I also know if I have a problem with it, Sinclair's will help. Of course later I looked at e-bay and saw a hundred brandname mics for $10.00.

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Dollar Bill posted this 27 July 2009

Don't fret about paying $75 for a high quality mic. No matter what you buy, you'll almost always find it somewhere cheaper. Ya, evlibay. The lure of the cheap deal. Never regret paying a fair price for a good tool.

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josber posted this 02 October 2010

I retired from the L.S. Starrett Co. last Dec.I worked there 26 years.You will find no finer tools anywhere.Do they cost more ,yes but worth every penny you spend. Lifetime warranty.If ever need servicing they repair or replace the tool.I'm not just saying this because I worked there .I started out as a machinest at age 14 and always bought Starrett tools.You will never regret buying them..

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fixin2 posted this 22 December 2010

Thank you josber for all the fine tools you have helped to make over the years. I make my living with micrometers and measuring tools as a QC inspector. I also worked for years as a machinist as well. I have some Starrett 436 mic's which I inherited(third generation) that are over 90 years old and calibrate good as new. That being said, I use Mitutoyo on a daily basis and trust them like no other. The feel is superior and the quality is like the Starretts of old. They're both fine tools but I'd give the edge to Mitutoyo these days.

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josber posted this 11 May 2011

OH no you said the M word.

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Savage99 posted this 03 July 2011

I have several. I like my Mitutoyo (Digital) and General (Analog). It depends on what you want to spend and how much of an “engineer” you are. I have used my vertical calipers as well and they are very very close. Keep them in the case and clean, as that will affect accuracy. Also, keep the micrometer and what you want to measure at the same temperature for at least 24 hours, depending on how accurate you want to be. I worked in a cal lab for awhile. Clean with Isoprol alcohol and clean tissue.

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