front sight /target preference

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  • Last Post 08 January 2020
porthos posted this 06 January 2020

i have several bolt action military rifles that i have installed  rear apeture and front globe sights on. with age; its getting harder to use them. what i'm asking is; what do you use for front apeture (post or circle) and target size  (diameter of black bull) or other than round bull.. all at 100 yds.

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Ross Smith posted this 06 January 2020

For bullseye shooting ,I use a front peep. For anything else I use a post or cross hair for better vision of the whole target area. Just my 2 cents.

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Larry Gibson posted this 06 January 2020

As with Ross I also use an aperture front with a bullseye (6" at 100 yards, 12" at 200 yards).  I use a post/blade front for other shooting.  Getting a rear aperture with a smaller aperture can bring things into focus or use a Merit type adjustable aperture (I really like these as you can adjust then instantly to fit the light conditions).  I have in the past cut a piece of black paster and stuck over the rear aperture and then used a pin to make the peep hole.  You can make it just large enough so the front sight is in focus.

Also you can get inexpensive reader glasses that can bring the front sight into focus through the aperture you have.  There are specialty made glasses and lens attachments to your glasses (if you wear them) also.

Getting old with eye sight going south sucks......

LMG

 

Concealment is not cover.........

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R. Dupraz posted this 06 January 2020

With a rifle, rear aperture  sights work best with a front globe sight that has an aperture insert that is large enough to leave a white ring around  the bulls eye. for a more precise center hold. A front sight post insert can be used depending on what color the bulls eye is and what sight picture you use..

My preference when I started shooting the CBA military matches was aperture front and rear for both the 100 and 200 yd. stages

This was before I reached the final stop in the journey and was forced to mount scopes.

Try them all and find out what type of sight you can shoot the best groups with using your hold and sight picture.. That's what I did.

A Merit adjustable eye disc is definitely an option in the attempt to hold off that scope for as long as possible.

 

 

R. 

M  

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GBertolet posted this 06 January 2020

I got the reader glasses for my iron sight usage. My right eye lens has the focal distance of about 30", which works for both rifle and pistol. The left eye is the standard prescription lens for me. I am right handed. When these glasses are first put on, the vision is blurred for a few moments, but the brain quickly compensates. After that, you don't notice you have the glasses on. It has done a lot to improve and extend my useful shooting years with iron sights.

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M3 Mitch posted this 06 January 2020

Most of my rifles have a bead front sight, What I really like to do is make about a 12" bullseye but a white one, by putting an old sanding disc on some card stock and then spray with black paint.

A "globe" type front sight would be better for straight up bullseye work, but the bead is fine for hunting and plinking.

Anyone else like to use a white bullseye against a black background?

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John Alexander posted this 07 January 2020

I have used a plain sheet of typing paper with a blade or bead front sight centered.  It is amazing the small groups possible in spite of such a big target.

John

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RicinYakima posted this 07 January 2020

When I was learning, poorly, to be a pistol shot, my coach would hang the target backwards. I could almost always shoot a better score than when I could see the bullseye. Then he knew I was "snatching" the trigger, trying to shoot X's.

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Ed Harris posted this 07 January 2020

Turning the "L" target around backwards to blank face was the standard Navy and Marine Corps method for basic marksmanship with the .45 M1911 or S&W .38 revolver from WW2 through the Vietnam era.  I qualified Expert that way as a Naval Aviation Cadet in 1967.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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RicinYakima posted this 07 January 2020

AH! My coach, Marty Buehler, shot on the Navy team from 1968 through 1971 and then the USMCR team from 1972 through 1988. Gunny Buehler could shoot, the windier and nastier the better for him.

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R. Dupraz posted this 07 January 2020

Ed wrote:

"Turning the "L" target around backwards to blank face was the standard Navy and Marine Corps method for basic marksmanship with the .45 M1911 or S&W .38 revolver from WW2 through the Vietnam era "

 

Back in the sixties and early seventies, when  I was shooting three gun bullseye, I used  this technique when practicing to work on sight alignment, trigger control and timing. Back side of a standard pistol target. either indoor or outdoor, depending. 

R.

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Larry Gibson posted this 07 January 2020

Amazing thread drift.....we go from...... 

"bolt action military rifles that i have installed  rear apeture and front globe sights on. with age; its getting harder to use them. what i'm asking is; what do you use for front apeture (post or circle) and target size  (diameter of black bull) or other than round bull.. all at 100 yds."

…...to pistol sights and turning targets backwards for pistol marksmanship......I just didn't see that coming......confused

LMG

Concealment is not cover.........

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RicinYakima posted this 07 January 2020

The form / shape of the aiming point has some relationship with the front sight and sight picture. But working on shooting skills other that sight position, blank is as good as anything.

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John Alexander posted this 07 January 2020

The older brown shoe army that I was in apparently hadn't figured out the reverse target trick but of course we had just stopped using horses.

John

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 07 January 2020

... i learned sight picture by articles by my heroes in the old school American Rifleman ...  1950's through about 1990 ...  funny, right up to about the time Ed Harris left ... 

.. i wanted to be a good shot, so i practiced sight picture visualization gun or no gun ...  looking back, i think my friends thot me a bit weird ...  bless their hearts ...

ken

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tlkeizer posted this 08 January 2020

Greetings,

When I started shooting, waay back when, it was with a Sheridan Blue Streak that father had put a peep sight on for rear sight, and the front was a wide post.  That little air rifle put a lot of holes in the target box and accounted for a number of rabbits, squirrels, sparrows, and a few other critters.  I still use one for squirrels up here in Alaska.  As such, I became somewhat proficient with blade front sights, and still prefer them.  In fact, when I bought a Hastings Rifled Slug Barrel for my Remington 870, I took a stone and squared up the beaded front sight and it shoots great.  Between hitches in the regular Army, I shot one summer on a rifle team at Fort Ord after ROTC summer camp as I was planning on making a career in the Army after my first hitch going in under the draft option (I figured the pay was a lot better being commissioned and it was).  I shot well enough that I began my high power competition in the Master's Classification.  I always shot well enough in the Masters class, but never won a thing, always seemed to be two or three better than I.  I still prefer the bladed front sight whether using a leaf or peep rear sight.  For me the bead was just too inaccurate.  So, what do I use?  Blade (or post).  

     I have used circular front sights; shooting small bore competition used aperture circular front sights, shot fairly well with them and liked them, but for high power and hunting much prefer the front post out of aperture,

TK

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John Alexander posted this 08 January 2020

Ken sez:

"looking back, i think my friends thot me a bit weird ...  bless their hearts ..."

If at least some of your friends don't think you a bit weird you have probably bought into too much conventional wisdom and should develop a better BS detector.

John

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delmarskid posted this 08 January 2020

I shoot round groups with a circular aperture front sight and a black bull. I shoot narrow vertically strung groups with a blade on a black bull. My scores using either are nearly the same. IF I can remember to not "go deep" on the black using the plain post I shoot nice tight groups . The remembering is now easier than the seeing. The top of the front sight has grown a sort of lawn on it.

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Qc Pistolero posted this 08 January 2020

R.Dupraz's way is also mine.If I use a post,I tend to group vertical strings.

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