NOE 360 .454gr mold for 45-70

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  • Last Post 18 June 2019
loophole posted this 14 June 2019

I love NOE molds.  I decided to cast lighter bullets for my 45-70's,  I had a number of rifles which were heavier, but I'm down to an H&R Officer's Model trapdoor and a C. Sharps which is basically a cavalry carbine with a 26" bbl.  My back rebels at maneuvering heavier rifles even to shoot off the bench, and though both these rifles shot very well with 405, 450, and 500 g r bullets, I want something with less recoil for shooting on my 200yd steel target range.  Both these rifles shot 1" 5-shot groups when I had younger eyes, and I hope to do as well after cataract surgery with lighter bullets.  I spent most of the week casting bullets with my new NOE mold and loading a duplex load of 5gr 5744 and 62gr Goex FFg. 

I have used mostly singly cavity molds, but I decided to try the NOE 3 cavity mold.  I am amazed at how much quicker the bullets pile up when you pour three at a time instead of one or two.  The cost of an NOE three cavity mold is not much more than a single cavity, and the process is no more difficult than with the single cavity mold. 

It took a while to get the new mold properly broken in, but no more than steel molds.  After following instructions exactly I still got wrinkled bullets until I sprayed the mold with brake cleaner.  After that perfect bullets.   I seem to remember that bullets were more uniform with one cavity molds in the days when they were made with a cherry.  Now I understand that with CNC machinery multi cavity mold throw uniform bullets.  I'll find out this Sat. if all goes well.

Loophole  

 

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M3 Mitch posted this 14 June 2019

Are you saying it's a 360 grain, .454" diameter mold?  Most 45-70 are .457 or bigger.   .454 is mostly for older .45 Colt and similar revolvers.  They may slug up with the black powder though. 

Good luck in any case.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 14 June 2019

... while on light loads for the 45-70, my current sissy plinking load of 12.8 gr unique and the lee old army 230 gr rn ....  seems to burn clean enough, but does leave a lot of soot on the front half of the case.

i really like that the little ruger 3 jumps a little but doesn't bruise ...

ken

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loophole posted this 15 June 2019

Mitch, you are right, of course.  It's a .460" dia.  Had  secretary for fourty years and never learned to type or proofread.  Ken, I was younger and thought I was immune to recoil when I bought the Ruger No. 3.  It taught me better, but I sure wish I still had it.

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M3 Mitch posted this 18 June 2019

I bought a 4-cavity Lyman 292 grain mold decades ago when Lyman had a "clean out the attic" sale.  This bullet works well in my 1886 45-70.  I can't remember the mold # off the top of my head. 

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JeffinNZ posted this 18 June 2019

Shooting is supposed to be fun.  No point beating yourself senseless with big bullets if you can have fun and shoot accurately with a little one IMHO.

Cheers from New Zealand

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