vintage bausch7 lomb question

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  • Last Post 25 April 2020
porthos posted this 14 March 2018

i have a pristine bausch & lomb 6-24 power ( the one with external adjustments) mounting on a 1955 mod- 70 bull bbl (30-06). the scope is new to me and i have a couple issues. sorry no pics. the scope tube dosen't  travel freely in its mounts no matter where i move the spring. therefore the spring does not return scope to battery. the top adjustment for elevation is centered on the tube. however the windage  turret button that moves the scope is 3/32 - 1/8 in. above center. last question; what is the 3rd turret adjustment on the lower left side  for?? anyone have the literature that came with this scope and can make me a copy??

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Brodie posted this 15 March 2018

It could quite possibly be a parallax adjustment.

 

B.E.Brickey

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porthos posted this 15 March 2018

can't be a parallex adjustment. it puts pressure on the outside of the tube at appx. 45 degrees.. its adjustable in and out that results in up and down at 45 degrees

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porthos posted this 15 March 2018

stupid me. my 1st unertl style scope. the third adjustment on the lower left; just keeps the tube from moving inside the houseing. its spring loaded and keeps pressure on the tube.

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Wheel Weights posted this 17 April 2020

A great classic scope. The scope rides in nylon buttons in the centering spring, W &E adjustments.

Clean the tube and these pressure points. Lubricate them with silicon. Move the recoil spring retainer to where it exerts no pressure to return the tube. Fire the gun. The scope should move forward a bit. BTW it is easier on any scope of this type to run them w/o the spring and return to battery by hand after each shot.

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Ross Smith posted this 17 April 2020

Nice scopes, I have one on my M/L bench gun. Paralax is adjusted by the rear eye piece. Gross windage and elevation by the screws in the rear mount and fine adjustment is with the rings in the rear mount. Focus is with the forward occular and magnification is controlled by the ring in front of the eye piece. If that isin't enough, MOA of elevation can be changed by the bases that the scope mounts to. If you change distances you have to refocus, change elevation etc. Great for the gun range, lousy for the Hunt. This is the simple version and there are much more experienced people out there than myself. Enjoy

 I too don't rely on the spring but manually reset the scope after each shot.

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Wheel Weights posted this 18 April 2020

Correction:  Paralax is controlled by the marked rings that surround the objective lens Just like a Unertl or Lyman TargetSpot. Focus is by turning the ocular lens housing.If you have the correct bases, the scope has plenty of elevation for modern cartridges out to 1000 yards.

If you poke around on Ebay you can probably find an original book that came with the scope. I've owned and sold 6 since 1970 and found them to be a good scope that can only be improved by replacing the B&L mounts with Unertls.

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Ross Smith posted this 20 April 2020

Yes ,you're right.

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John Alexander posted this 20 April 2020

I believe the objective lens focuses on the target (and eliminates paralax) and turning the ocular lens (eye end) focuses on the cross wires.

John

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Ross Smith posted this 20 April 2020

I think I have the terms reversed john.

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Wheel Weights posted this 20 April 2020

John has the sequence reversed,

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John Alexander posted this 20 April 2020

Well, I may have the sequence reversed but with all my scopes I have to twist that big thingee on the front end of the scope that I call that the objective lens when I change from the 100 yard match to the 200 yard match. When the image is sharp the parallax seems to be gone.

With a new scope I sometimes twist the eyepiece end of the scope to sharpen the image of the cross wires. I usually never muck with that end of the scope again.

Could be I'm out of step since I also shoot a caliber that shouldn't win matches and don't weigh my bullets which aren't round like they're supposed to be.

John

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RicinYakima posted this 20 April 2020

E.C. Crossman in his book Book of the Springfield has about 50 pages on description and use of target scopes of the 1920's. The lens that faces the target is the objective lens (to the object). The lens that faces the eye is the ocular (to the orbit).

Shooting without glasses, or single focal lenses, the objective lens is corrected to reduce parallax first. The sharpening of the crosshairs with the ocular lens is harder because so many have Varilux, tri-focal and bi-focal glasses. Looking thru different parts of my lenses can make the cross hairs fuzzy.

The higher the magnification the more critical the adjustments, which is why scopes of usually 6X or less don't have any objective focus ability. But all have crosshair ocular adjustments.

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Ross Smith posted this 23 April 2020

John, that's how it is with me also. There's about 8 ways to adjust one of these but once you're set up, you only need 3. I think. When I got my 6-24 balvar I knew less than nothing about them. I still am humbled by it. Now that I have taken the rear scope ring apart, cleaned it and accidently put it back together correctly, replace the un-equal height bases with equal ones so it will now hit the paper at 100 yds,dressed the ends of the scope ring clamping screws to fit the basesso the rings actually lock on to the bases, and figgered out the cross hair focus deal, I like this scope. It and the 50 lb M/L bench gun always draws a crowd.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 23 April 2020

... the old monster 6-24 is sort of an antique ... but back in 1958 a buddy and i were sniping jackrabbits...  he had a sako .222 with a heavy marquart barrel and that piece of art on top of it ...    

i remember settling those fine crosshairs on the eye of a big jack at about 200 yards ... i was so impressed that i remain a B&L guy to this day.

i even for a time had a nice example of the old 6-24 Balvar long tube ... but never had the right exact gun to put it on, so i sent it on to a more useful home.

enjoy a couple shots for me ... ken

 

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mashburn posted this 24 April 2020

Hello,

I, at one time owned Unertls-Feckers & Lyman target spot or dots, which ever it is. I loved the way they looked on my old single shot varmint rifles and liked to shoot paper at the same distance shot after shot. The first time that I took them on a prairie dog shoot, I got so tired of reaching forward, and sometimes having to stand up to reach the objective adjustment ring and turning to go from say a 150 yd. dog to a 300 yd. dog. There were a lot of people with a pocket full of money that wanted them worse than I did, so I parted company with them. I still miss the way they looked. Nothing like them for beauty in my book.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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Wheel Weights posted this 25 April 2020

The way to set up any scope with an AO or "side focus" is to set the AO at infinity. Set the scope to max power. Then gazing thru the scope at a clear sky, focus the reticle, frequently moving your head away to reset your eye.

After is is sharp, then set the AO at the marked range distance. Some fine tuning of the AO may be necessary to eliminate parallax, BUT don't mess with the eyepiece.

This fellow adds more details:  http://www.wilhelm.co.nz/focusriflescope2.pdf

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