Primer seating tools

  • 549 Views
  • Last Post 03 May 2017
R. Dupraz posted this 17 April 2017

What's the advantage of using a hand primer seating tool instead of doing it in a reloading press? Some better than others?

Attached Files

Order By: Standard | Newest | Votes
Tom Acheson posted this 17 April 2017

The most frequent comment I've seen is that hand unit lets you “feel” the primer being seated better than the press approach. The length of the moment arm and ease of pressure application using the press arm on the press mounted unit, reduces the sensitivity that you can detect as the primer is entering the primer pocket.

FWIW

 

Tom

Attached Files

MarkinEllensburg posted this 17 April 2017

A couple of advantages are with some hand tools you never have to touch a primer. You also do not have to fill a primer tube, a time consuming and possibly hazardous exercise although I've not read one single account of a primer detonation in a tube in the 40+ years that I've been around it.

Attached Files

John Alexander posted this 17 April 2017

I have always used the Lee hand tools with the magazines since they came out and it seems faster to me in addition to Tom's reasons.

John

Attached Files

David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 17 April 2017

I began using the Lee priming tool in the late 70s and was very happy with the “feel” it gave me in seating the primers over the press. But an added bonus was the speed and ease of use. Then about ten years later I decided to try the RCBS hand held priming tool. It is very similar to the Lee, but it did not work as easy or smoothly as the Lee tool, giving up some of the “feel". I went back to the Lee and have never looked back. I suppose if I would have started with the RCBS, I would have stuck with it feeling I had the best tool, but in my opinion the Lee tool is superior and much cheaper too.

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys & Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

Attached Files

R. Dupraz posted this 17 April 2017

How do these hand primer seaters work when priming de-crimped military cases? I use them in a couple of rifles and it takes a little more effort to cap these.

I have never used a hand priming tool. Always a press with an automatic feed. Great when they work but a pain when they don't. Some years ago, I bought a Hornady single stage press with an auto primer feed as a replacement to the old tool that I had used for years. I chose the Hornady mainly because there was a L&L progressive here already and I do like the L&L bushing set up.

No complaints with the press itself, basically similar to any other, but the auto primer feed needs some serious re-engineering. for several different reasons. Not the least of which is a tiny wire spring that holds the primers in the storage tube and then moves out of the way when the primer arm picks up a primer each time. Very poor design.  Routinely leaks primers or when the spring starts to lose it's tension, instant emptying of the storage tube on the floor.

I did get a new spring right from Hornady a couple of years ago but now I'm faced with the same thing again. and handling the primers one at a time. I

My patience isn't what it used to be and have pretty much reached the end. So am searching for alternatives.  That's why I don't buy green bananas any more either.   

Attached Files

RicinYakima posted this 17 April 2017

RD, I love primer tools and gadgets, but have settled on the old Lee tool with the screw in case holder and no magazine feed. Since I do not sweat acetone or MEK, it doesn't matter if I touch a primer or not. In fact I put a little Imperial sizing die wax on my left index finger to make it sticky to pick up the primers. Feel using the tool is good. If I don't have a shellholder, I use an RCBS Ram Prime die and punch. Ric

Attached Files

norm posted this 18 April 2017

RD, I never used a primer feed tube when I primed on the press when I started reloading.Soon bought a Lee hand priming tool and liked it except you need Lee's special shell holders.  Bought an RCBS when I found out that it used regular shell holders.  Very happy with the RCBS and have used it for over 20 years.

Attached Files

OU812 posted this 18 April 2017

I have the RCBS version that uses shell holders. The other RCBS version has a one size fits all shell holder.

I make sure to seat primer until lever stops. Stopping short of that may not be good?

I do not own the Lee version. Is it easy to feel when it stops?

Attached Files

SouthDakota1 posted this 18 April 2017

Mr. Dupraz

I agree with most of the comments listed as far as preferring the Lee Primer Hand Tool.  The “feel” of the primer being fully seated is unmistakable...it a very consistent “seat".  As you noted concerning military brass, I have tried priming de-crimped military bass in the Lee, but it was a bit of a rough “squeeze".  Also, I have used the RCBS Hand tool that uses their regular shell holders and that has been satisfactory.   The RCBS Tool seemed to have greater leverage in seating primers in de-crimped military case and worked better than the Lee for that purpose...however, for the most part the Lee Hand tools wins out for general commercial brass cases which is the majority of cases I use.   Good luck in evaluating the options available with hand priming tools...there are many choices.

mm 

Marc A. Moore

Attached Files

shootcast posted this 18 April 2017

I have always used hand prime tools. Mainly just thought it was easier and quick. Most have been Lee. Lately I have been disappointed with the Lee tools.  Now they sell a update kit and the new tools come equipped with it. This is a big improvement over the past. For some reason I still get a primer that flips in the tool. Pays to look at the primer just before installing the case into tool. I have only had this problem with small primers. The large primer adapter has been flawless. Lee's price is half of the others. Try it I think you will like it.

Attached Files

David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 18 April 2017

With the Lee tool I have not had any issues priming military cases, but my experience with them has been primarily .223 with small primers. As far as the Lee tool having to use it's own shell holders, they are inexpensive at about $2.80 each and they come in a set. 

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys & Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

Attached Files

Hick posted this 18 April 2017

I use the RCBS hand primers with the shell holders.  I prefer this because I'm a little process oriented and like to separate the steps of reloading in order to avoid double charges.  I start with 50 unprimed cases in a loading block, then hand prime all 50.  Then, one by one, I take a primed case from that loading block, Add powder, and place the case in a different loading block.  Its just my way of being careful.  I also  sometimes prime sets.  If I am planning a range trip with several rifles and loads, I might do a priming session one evening and loading sessions separately.  The hand primer makes this easy.  I also have two hand primers-- one permanently set for small primers and one permanently set for large primers-- all I have to do is occasionally swap our the shell holders.

Attached Files

R. Dupraz posted this 18 April 2017

Appreciate the replies Gents.

Decision time

From a certified member of the ripe banna gang.

 

 

Attached Files

j35nut posted this 19 April 2017

I have used the  Lee auto prime for close to 30 years

Lately in the winter my thumb cracks open from the dry air so back in January

I bought the RCBS bench prime and have adapted to it, its a nice tool.

----------J

Attached Files

BigMan54 posted this 19 April 2017

I started loading using a 310 tong tool to prime .38spl cases. I was about 4yrs old.

When I started my own loading set up in the mid '70's I got a LYMAN press with an auto-primer feed. Didn't like it. Bought a RCBS Standard Priming tool. Bench mounted.  Used for a few years until LEE brought out their hand priming tool.  Used up 2 of them. By then RCBS had come out with their tray fed hand priming tool.  I've used it ever since.  I single stage size & prime off the press and then switch to the progressive.  Never have to worry about  crushed/ cocked-up primer. 

Long time Caster/Reloader, Getting back into it after almost 10yrs. Life Member NRA 40+yrs, Life S.A.S.S. #375. Does this mean a description of me as a fumble-fingered knuckle-draggin' baboon. I also drool in my sleep. I firmly believe that true happiness is a warm gun.

Attached Files

Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 19 April 2017

speaking of process ... after priming rifle brass, i put the cases neck down in the loading block ... then fill my belding mull tube and always pour into a case newly turned upright ..  doesn't slow me down much because the ByM is slow anyway ... heh .

with pistol cases i might use my rcbs lil' rotary measure ... but double visibly check every load before seating bullet .  if a light load i use a dipstick  ... ” chickenstick ” ?

five fingered ken ... who has observed other loaders blow up guns ...

Attached Files

BigMan54 posted this 19 April 2017

My Uncle had  primer tube detonation on brand new MEC 650 in the mid 60's. 

I wasn't there, but I saw the remains of the tube afterwards. 

Long time Caster/Reloader, Getting back into it after almost 10yrs. Life Member NRA 40+yrs, Life S.A.S.S. #375. Does this mean a description of me as a fumble-fingered knuckle-draggin' baboon. I also drool in my sleep. I firmly believe that true happiness is a warm gun.

Attached Files

Rich/WIS posted this 19 April 2017

Used to prime on the press and tried the hand tools, worked okay. Now still using a Lee Auto Prime II that I bought about 25 years ago on a dedicated Lee C press (the little $25 one).  Issue I have with the hand held is arthritis, very little hand strength and painful.  The little press is not high leverage and you can feel the primer bottom out in the pocket.  Only negative is it will not work with all primer makes.  Also have a Lee Ram Prime that you put the primer in one at a time which is handy if I have to use primers that are not recommended in the Auto Prime II.

Attached Files

GP Idaho posted this 20 April 2017

I've had good luck with and a lot of use out of my Hornady Handheld priming tool. It comes with two primer trays, one works with the Hornady shell holders and the other with RCBS. I've never owned a Lee priming tool but most people seem to have good luck with them. RCBS must make a couple of different models. I've seen posts that others use and like them. The RCBS priming tool that came with the Rockchucker bundle reloading package is one of the few reloading tools that I've actually thrown in the trash.  Gp

Attached Files

10Speed posted this 20 April 2017

speaking of process ... after priming rifle brass, i put the cases neck down in the loading block ... then fill my belding mull tube and always pour into a case newly turned upright ..  doesn't slow me down much because the ByM is slow anyway ... heh .

with pistol cases i might use my rcbs lil' rotary measure ... but double visibly check every load before seating bullet .  if a light load i use a dipstick  ... ” chickenstick ” ?

five fingered ken ... who has observed other loaders blow up guns ...

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

I use the “neck down” method for storing primed brass prior to loading as well.  I double check charged cases, too.  I like the idea of the dipstick.

 

Attached Files

Show More Posts
Close